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Ipswich Public Library 

Ipswiefe, Massachusetts 



Town Report 
1971 
REF: ONLY 



town m 

I PSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 



1 




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106 






971 ANNUAL REPORT 



FRONT COVER PHOTOGRAPH 

"THE WHIPPLE HOUSE" cl638 One of the oldest buildings 

standing in New England and one of the finest examples of 17th 

century architecture. It was in the Whipple family for two hundred 

years. The west side was built in 1638-40, the east in 1670. Hewn 

overhang, original pine panelling with beams. It is a National Historic 
Site. 



BACK COVER DRAWINGS 

'THE GREENHEAD FLY", Tabanus nigrovittatus M, is a menace to 
any person who might be on our lovely beaches or near our marshes 
during approximately 4-6 weeks of the summer. This terrible creature 
is known to fly directly from its marshy habitat to an unsuspecting 
victim in a boat or on a beach and as far inland as Town centers 
and beyond. Its bite is unforgetable and its outer protective armoured 
skin is nearly impervious to destruction by hand. Through the 
assistance of the Essex County Mosquito Control Project and Ipswich 
residents, we are trying to alleviate our Greenhead Fly problem by 
placing traps throughout the Town. 

"THE IPSWICH CLAM", Mya Arenaria, is the livelihood of many 
Ipswich residents, and the joy of eating them is as widespread as far 
as Texas to Canada. These clams are normally found in sand and mud 
throughout the coastal areas of the Town. Clams are excellent fried, 
steamed, and in stews, chowders, casseroles and clam cakes. The 
original and traditional use of "Ipswich Clams" is in chowders. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 



1971 ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials 


and 


Committees 


2 


Building Inspector 


31 


Annual Town Meeting 




4 


Recreation Department 


32 


Board of Selectmen 




14 


Cemetery Department 


34 


Eligable for Jury Duty 




15 


Public Library 


34 


Jury Duty - 1971 




15 


Electric Board 


35 


Planning Board 




16 


Government Study 


37 


Vital Statistics 




17 


Housing Authority 


37 


Zoning Board of Appeals 




18 


School Committee 


40 


Town Manager's Report 




19 


Superintendent of Schools 


40 


Treasurer - .Collector 




20 


High School Principal 


41 


Finance 




20 


Junior High School Principal 


42 


Historical Commission 




21 


Elementary School Principals 


44 


Town Counsel 




21 


Director of Pupil Personnel Services 48 


Assessing 




21 


Director of Elementary Education 49 


Youth Commission 




22 


Enrollment Charts 


50 


Police Department 




24 


Expenditure Statement - Public Schools 51 


Fire Department 




26 


Graduation Program 


52 


Civil Defense 




27 


High School Graduates 


52 


Veterans Service 




28 


Conservation Commission 


53 


Shellfish - Harbor Department 




28 


Shellfish Commission 


55 


Board of Health 




29 


Essex County Mosquito Control 


55 


Public Works 




29 


Salary Rates 


58 






CREDITS 








PHOTOGRAPHS: 


Ipswich Chronicle 












Salem Evening News 












Beverly Times 












Ipswich Today 












House of Hinlin 








ART WORK 












PRINTING: 




Rowley Printing, Inc. 
Rowley, Mass. 





ELECTED 



TOWN MODERATOR 

Harry E. Munro 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman 
John S. Bialek 
Elizabeth S. Cole 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Paul J. Gillespie 



CONSTABLE 

Bernie Spencer 



Term Expires 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




1972 


Edwin H. Damon, Jr., Chairman 


1974 




M. L. Scudder 


1972 




Peter Zervas 


1972 




Robert K. Weatherall 


1973 


1972 


Walter J. Pojasek 


1973 


1972 


Rainer Broekel 


1973 


1973 


Edward J. Michon 


1974 


1974 






1974 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 






John G. Thatcher, Jr., Chairman 


1973 




Glenfred A. Wanzer 


1974 




Stanley E. Eustace 


1975 




Arthur B. Weagle 


1976 


1972 


Alexander Bernhard, State Member 


1976 



APPOINTED 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Elected At Town Meeting 

Charles C. Dalton 

Richard A. Robie 

Roger A. Burke 
Appointed By Moderator 

Nathaniel M. Quint 

Robert A. Woodburn 

Anthony J. Klos 
Appointed By Selectmen 

David W. Scudder 

Paul K. Gahni 

William G. Markos, Chairman 

TOWN MANAGER 

Richard N. Conti 

TOWN TREASURER 

George C. Mourikas 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Robert Leet 



1974 
1973 
1972 

1974 
1972 
1973 

1974 
1972 
1973 



1973 



1974 



1973 



SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Arthur N. Moon 



TOWN CLERK 

Harold G. Comeau 

TREE WARDEN 

Armand T. Michaud 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. William C. Wigglesworth, Chairman 

Dr. Joseph W. Adamowicz 

Norman L. Quint 

Roland R. Foucher, Health Agent 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Gordon C. Player, Chairman 
Leon B. Turner 
Nicholas A. Markos 



1972 



1974 



1972 



1972 
1974 
1973 
1972 



1974 
1973 
1972 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

James Lampropoulos 
John Kobos 
Barbara J. Rousseau 
Harold G. Comeau, Clerk 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



1972 
1974 
1973 



Varnum S. Pedrick 


1972 


William R. Lewis 


1973 


John D. Heaphy 


1974 


SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 




Edward Nagus, Chairman 


1972 


Andrew Gianakakis 


1972 


Edward Paquin 


1972 


Joseph Kmiec 


1972 


Joseph Lauderowicz 


1972 


Charles R. Terrell 


1972 


Henry Minichello 


1972 


Arthur Moon (ex-officio member) 





TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

Charles Goodhue 
Eleanor Pearson 
Mark J. Apsey 

TOWN COUNSEL 

F. Dale Vincent, Jr. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Edmund P. Gillis 



PLANNING BOARD 

William H. Davis III, Chairman 
John P. Prosser 
William L. Thoen 
George A. Nikas 
Jason A. Sokolov 



1974 
1973 
1972 



1972 



1972 



1972 
1974 
1976 
1975 
1973 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



MBTA ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 


1972 


Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 


1975 


S. Harold Perley 


1973 


Thaddeus Maciejowski 


1974 


Julius Kaszuba 


1976 


Clarence Richter, Alternate 


1972 


Hollie Bucklin, Alternate 


1972 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Sarah L. Weatherall, Chairman 


1973 


Frederic Winthrop, Jr. 


1974 


William C. Hickling 


1972 


Jacob M. Israelsohn 


1972 


Joan Cudhea 


1972 


Costos Tsoutsouris 


1973 


Dr. Robert L. Goodale 


1974 


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 




Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman 


1972 


Eugene A. Calabro 


1972 


John Rieman 


1976 


Terrance R. McSweeney 


1975 


Peter W. Williamson 


1974 


Thomas Emery 


1974 


Carol Berry 


1973 


Richard Banville 


1974 


Dale E. Dudgeon 


1975 


RECREATION AND PARKS COMMITTEE 




James H. Daly, Director 


1972 


Charles J. Foley, Chairman 


1974 


Eleanor Knowles 


1974 


Stanley Eustace 


1972 


Frederick Jenkins 


1973 


Elizabeth J. Geanakakis 


1972 


GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 




Irving Small, Chairman 


1972 


Jacob Israelsohn 


1972 


William Smith 


1972 


Jessie Girard 


1972 


Gordon Burlingham 


1972 


John Eby 


1972 


Maryruth Williamson 


1972 


Peter Zervas 


1972 


Alfred D. Castantini 


1972 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION 




John F. Conley, Chairman 


1973 


Barbara C. Emberly 


1972 


Louise B. Hodgkins 


1972 


George R. Mathey 


1972 


Lovell Thompson 


1973 


John G. Markos 


1974 


Alice Keenan 


1973 


CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 




John R. Harrigan 


1972 


MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMITTEE 




Alice Keenan, Chairman 


1972 


Cynthia A. Burns 


1972 


James Breton 


1972 


Harold Balch 


1972 


Herbert Brack 


1972 


Marion Clarkin 


1972 


Byron Bennett 


1972 



John C. Vincent, Jr., Chairman 


1972 


Harold F. Balch 


1972 


Bruce R. Ball 


1972 


Raymond S. Barrows 


1972 


Leland Carter 


1972 


Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 


1972 


Charles Goodhue, Jr. 


1972 


Doris Greenlaw 


1972 


Cornelius Cleary 


1972 


James C. McManaway 


1972 


Robert W. Weatherall 


1972 


Robert B. Walder 


1972 


ELECTRIC ADVISORY BOARD 




George H. Bouchard, Chairman 


1972 


Alan Whitehead 


1972 


Eugene L. Ames 


1972 


Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr. 


1972 


George E. Taylor 


1972 


John A. Pechilis 


1972 


Lawrence R. Sweetser 


1972 


John H. Ward 


1972 


Alexander A. Sweenie, Jr. 


1972 


SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE 




Harold Nelson, Chairman 


1972 


Edwin Damon 


1972 


William George 


1972 


Joseph McGee 


1972 


Paul Gahm 


1972 


Edward Michon 


1972 


Robert Ray 


1972 


YOUTH COMMISSION 




Annette I. George, Director 




Brother W. Robert Russell, Chairman 


1973 


David Baldwin 


1974 


Sally Coates 


1972 


George W. Pacheco 


1973 


Cathleen McGinley 


1973 


Robert LaBrie, Jr. 


1974 


Mary Graffum 


1972 


SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 




Ralph M. O'Brien 


1972 


HARBOR MASTER 




Arthur Moon 


1972 


WIRING INSPECTOR 




Alfred Tobiasz 


1972 


GAS INSPECTOR 




Edmond Gillis 


1972 


PLUMBING INSPECTOR 




A.N.D. Hyde 


1972 


ALTERNATE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 




Rene Rathe 


1972 


BELL RINGER 




Harold D. Bowen 


1972 


MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 




Armand Michaud 


1972 


DOG OFFICER 




John Wegzyn 


1972 



ESSEX, s.s. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said 

County 

GREETINGS: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, you are hereby directed to notify the Inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Ipswich qualified to vote in 
town affairs to meet at the Ipswich High School in 
said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE FIRST DAY OF MARCH, 1971 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the following 
articles vi/: 

Moderator Harry Munro called the meeting to order 
at 7:30 p.m. He announced that 673 voters were pre- 
sent; 319 needed for a quorum. The final count 
showed that 1007 voters attended the meeting. 

The Moderator announced that there were a number 
of non-registered voters and guests who have requested 
permission to observe the meeting, among them the 
town manager and the director o( public works. There 
being no objections, all were allowed to enter the 
assembly, but placed in an area separated from the 
registered voters. 

A Salute to the Flag was led by Town Clerk 
Anthony Murawski. 

The Invocation was given by Rev. Merle Pimental, 
minister of the United Methodist Church. 

Moved by Mr. John Bialek that the Town Clerk 
read the opening and closing paragraphs of the Warrant 
and the Constable's Return. Seconded. Unanimous 
Voice Vote. Town Clerk Anthony Murawski read the 
opening and closing paragraphs of the Warrant and the 
Constable's Return. 

The following tellers were named by the Moderator: 
Messrs. Paul Valcour, A. Richard MarcAurele, Donald 
Talcott, Stanley E. Eustace, Hollie A. Bueklin, Jr., 
Robert H. Lang, Jr., Daniel B. Lunt, Jr., and George 
Hayes. 

Moderator stated that he would allow no more than 
5 minutes for any individual's discussion on explana- 
tion of a motion. 

Prompted by motion of Mr. Angelo Johnson to 
conclude all business at 1 1 p.m., Mr. Nathaniel Quint 
suggested that we proceed with the meeting until 1 1 
p.m. and determine at that time whether to continue 
until completion of the articles or to postpone until a 
time certain. Mr. Johnson agreed to Mr. Quint's sug- 
gestion, and it was the consensus of the assembly to 
abide by said motion. 

Article 1 . To fix the salary and compensation of all 
elected town officers. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the salary and compensa- 
tion of all elected officers be fixed as in the 1971 
budget. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 2. To choose the following officers, viz:- 
Moderator for one (1) year 
Two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years 
Constable for one (1) year 



Two (2) Members of the School Committee for 

three (3) years 
One (1) Member of the Housing Authority for 

five (5) years 
And to vote "Yes" or "No" to the following 

questions: 

Question No. 1. "Shall the Fluoridation of the 
public water supply for domestic use in this town be 
continued?" 

Question No. 2. "Shall an act passed by the 
General Court in the year nineteen hundred and sixty- 
six, entitled 'An Act Establishing a Selectmen-Town 
Manager Form of Government for the Town of 
Ipswich' be retained?" 

The above articles to be voted on one ballot at 
their respective polling places as follows: 
Precinct 1 Ipswich Junior High School, Green Street 
Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central Street 
Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street 
Precinct 4 Burley School, Mount Pleasant Avenue 
on Monday, March 8, 1971. The polls shall open at 
10 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. 

No action required. 

Article 3. To choose one member of the Finance 
Committee to serve for three (3) years. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that Mr. Charles Dalton be 
nominated to the Finance Committee to serve for a 
period of three years. Seconded. 

Moved by Mr. Andrew Gianakakis, that Mr. William 
F. Zachman be nominated to the Finance Committee 
to serve for a period of three years. Seconded. 

Moved by Mr. Charles Rose that nominations be 
closed. Seconded. 

Hand Votes recorded for Mr. Charles Dalton, 549; 
for Mr. Zackman, 164. Moderator announced that Mr. 
Charles Dalton has been appointed to the Finance 
Committee to serve for a period of three years. 

Article 4. To choose one member of the Finance 
Committee to fill a vacancy to serve for two (2) 
years. 

Moved by Mr. James Smyth that Richard A. Robie 
be nominated to the Finance Committee to serve for 
a period of two years. Seconded. 

Moved by Mr. Charles Coulouras that Mr. Edward 
Kozeneski be nominated to the Finance Committee to 
serve for a period of two years. Seconded. 

Moved by Mr. Rose that nominations be closed, 
Seconded. Hand Vote recorded for Mr. Richard A. 
Robie, 596; for Mr. Kozeneski, 145. Moderator 
announced that Mr. Richard A. Robie has been 
appointed to the Finance Committee to serve for a 
period of two years. 

Article 5. To choose one member of the Finance 
Committee to fill a vacancy to serve for one (1) year. 

Moved by Mr. Charles Rose that Roger A. Burke 
be nominated to the Finance Committee to serve, for 
a period of one year. Seconded. 



WbuUyottWp? 

Quality government needs 

to find concerned and 

effective members for our 

boards and commissions. 

Are (jou ovaiiabk ? 



Please complete and return 



Name 


Town of Ipswich 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 


Address 


Telephone— Home 


Business 


Interested in '■ 
(Town Committee 2 


Amount of Time 
Dates Available 




TOWN OFFICES HELD 
in Ipswich or Elsewhere) 


Present Business Affiliation and Work 


Date 
Appointed 


Office 


Term 
Expired 


Business Experience 
































Education or Special Training 




































The filling out of this form in no way assures appointment. 
All committee vacancies will be filled by citizens deemed 








most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. (See reverse 

side list of committees.) 


For Additional— Use Reverse Side 



Good Government Starts with You 






TOWN OFFICES 
To Which Regular Appointments Are Made 


REMARKS 


Electric Advisory Board 

Board of Assessors 

Conservation Commission 

Board of Health 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Planning Board 

Industrial Development Commission 

Recreation and Parks Committee 

Historical Commission 

Mosquito Control Committee 

Civil Defense 

Historic District Commission 

Action, Inc. 

Finance Committee 

Registrars of Voters 

Trust Fund Commissioners 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Government Study Committee 

MBTA Advisory Committee 

Youth Commission 




It would be most helpful if particular fields - such as 

finance, law, engineering, etc. be emphasized on this form, 

so that the selections may be made on the best evaluation 

of interests and special qualifications possible. 


Mail to — 

Secretary, Town Manager 

Ipswich 

Massachusetts 



Moved by Mr. Cornelius Cleary that Thomas B. 
Emery, 3 Town Farm Road be nominated to the 
Finance Committee to serve for a period of one year. 
Seconded. 

Moved by Mr. Anthony Klos that nominations be 
closed. Seconded. Hand Count recorded for Mr. Roger 
A. Burke, 588; for Mr. Emery, 167. Moderator 
announced that Mr. Roger A. Buike has been 
appointed to serve on the Finance Committee for a 
period of one year. 

Article 6. To hear and act upon the report of the 
Finance Committee, and raise and appropriate and 
transfer money for the ensuing year, including the 
compensation of town officers. 

Moved by Mr. William Markos that the sum of 
$4,825,910.00 be raised and appropriated for the pur- 
pose hereinafter designated: 



S 



For the 

of this 

5,174 

1,455 

179 

217,000 

20,000 

494 

1.913,745 

2. For the 

of this 

2,136 

57,099 

For the 

of this 

7,500 

15,791 

221 

2,585,103 



Operating Budget 



$2,158,049.00 



00 From Overlay Surplus 

65 From Reimbursement of Damages 

81 From Highway Machinery Fund 

00 From Surplus Revenues 

00 From Sewer Receipts Reserve 

35 From County Dog Refund 

19 To be Raised and Assessed 



$ 



$ 



Library Budget 

00 From Library Aid Reserve 
00 To be Raised and Assessed 



$59,235.00 



School Budget 



$2,608,617.00 



00 From the Feoffees 

56 From P. L. 874 

57 From the Band Fund 

87 To be raised and assessed. 



The total recommended budgets are $4,825,910.00 

The total available funds are 269,952.94 

The total to be raised and assessed is 4,555,948.06 

Seconded. 

Mr. Markos spoke on the motion. He announced 
that the estimated 1971 tax rate, hopefully, will re- 
main at $56 per $1000 valuation; if not, it "will be 
established between 57 and 58 dollars, at the maxi- 
mum. 

Mr. William Zackman moved to amend the motion 
by inserting at the end: "However, no funds shall be 
spent under this or any other appropriation by any 
officer, committee, or operating department of the 
town for the support of the Middlesex-Essex Power 
Pool (MEPP) or of the publication of Plum Island 
Soundings (PIS) or of any other activity sponsored by 
MEPP." Seconded. 

Mr. Markos urged that the meeting reject this 
amendment, stating that there is nothing in the appro- 
priations set aside for said expenditures. 

Mr. Zackman asked for town counsel's opinion on 
the issue and town counsel stated that the light 
department is entirely self-supporting as an income 
producing department and requires no town meeting 
appropriation. 



The voice vote was taken on the amendment and 
did not carry and so stated by the Moderator. 

Hand Count on original motion carried with 695 
voting in the affirmative; 1 opposed. 

I. OPERATING BUDGET 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



1. MODERATOR 




Salary 


$ 100 


Expenses 


25 


Total 


125 


2. SELECTMEN 




Salaries & Wages 


6,287 


Expenses 


2,725 


Capital Outlay 


— 


Total 


9,012 


3. FINANCE COMMITTEE 




Salaries 


100 


Expenses 


860 


Total 


960 


4. PLANNING BOARD 




Salaries & Wages 


500 


Expenses 


1 1 ,200 


Capital Outlay 


— 


Total 


1 1 ,700 


5. ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION 




Salaries & Wages 


6,050 


Expenses 


1,200 


Total 


7,250 



6. APPEALS BOARD 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

7. TOWN MANAGER 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

8. ACCOUNTANT 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

9. TREASURER & COLLECTOR 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

10. ASSESSOR 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

11. BILLING DEPARTMENT 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



125 
200 

325 



30,253 
16,760 

47,013 



23,541 
7,697 

31,238 



27,121 
3,412 

30,533 



22,041 
3,249 

25,290 



12. TOWN CLERK 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

13. LEGAL DEPARTMENT 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 

14. ENGINEERING 
Salaries 
Expenses 

Total 

15. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Total 





25. BUILDING INSPECTOR 


11,219 


Salaries & Wages 


2,420 


Expenses 


250 


Total 


13,889 






TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 


1 1 ,600 


HEALTH AND < 


395 




1 1 ,995 


26. TOWN HEALTH AGENT 




Salaries & Wages 




Expenses 


— 


Capital Outlay 


— 


Total 




27. OUTSIDE CONTRACTS 




Garbage Collection 


100 


Rubbish Collection 


450 


Dump Maintenance 


550 


Total 



4,500 
1,040 
5,540 

$415,258 



S 15,160 
4,460 

19,620 



27,000 

52,000 

30,500 

109,500 



16. HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Expenses 

17. CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

18. HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 
Expenses 

19. NUCLEAR ADVISORY 
Expenses 

20. IPSWICH YOUTH COMMISSION 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

21. POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

22. FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



300 



TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 



VETERANS SERVICES 



SI 29,1 20 



23 



. CIVIL DEFENSE 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



24. SHELLFISH & HARBOR 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



150 


28. VI II RANS BENEFITS 


190 


Salaries & Wages 




Expenses 


340 


Total 




PUBLIC 


225 






29. ADMINISTRATION 




Salaries & Wages 


1.200 


Expenses 




Capital Outlay 




Total 


1 .325 




5,450 


30. BUILDING DIVISION 


6,775 


a) Town Hall 




Salaries & Wages 


S 198.720 


1 Kpenses 




Capital Outlay 




Total 




b) Memorial Building 




Salaries & Wages 




Expenses 


SI 83.050 


Total 


13,850 




7,162 


c) Sewer Building 


204,062 


Expenses 




d) Fire Building 


174,834 


Expenses 


10,750 


Capital Outlay 


1 ,600 


Total 


187,184 






e) Town Garage 




Expenses 


1.000 


Capital Outlay 


1.510 


Total 


1,000 




3,510 


f) Cemetery Buildings 




Expenses 


8,962 


g) Park Buildings 


5,350 


Expenses 


650 


Rent 


14,962 


Total 



124,500 
SI 24,500 



S 1 1.922 
3.565 

15,487 



6,264 
5,550 

1,814 



3,475 
3,475 



495 



2,525 
2,592 
5,117 



2,150 

500 

2,650 



610 



1 ,650 
2,370 
4,020 



h) Library Building 




Expenses 


2,000 


Capital Outlay 


3,975 


Total 


5,975 


31. HIGHWAY DIVISION 




Salaries & Wages 


S 66,580 


Expenses 


86,865 


Capital Outlay 


15,200 


Total 


168,645 


32. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 




Salaries & Wages 


14.344 


Expenses 


28,850 


Capital Outlay 


— 


Total 


43,194 


33. SNOW AND ICE CONTROL 




Salaries & Wages 


18.000 


Expenses 


20,000 


Outside Rentals 


10,000 


Total 


48,000 


34. FORESTRY 




Salaries & Wages 


30.838 


Expenses 


9.380 


Capital Outlay 


7200 


Total 


47,418 


35. SEWER 




Salaries and Wages 


16,902 


Expenses 


16.055 


Capital Outlay 


2,500 


Total 


35.457 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 

RECREATION AND PARKS 



EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 



S392,357 



36. RECREATION & PARKS 




Salaries and Wages 


S 44.454 


Expenses 


14,780 


Capital Outlay 


3,700 


Total 


62,934 


CEMETERIES 




37. CEMETERIES 




Salaries & Wages 


S 37,569 


Expenses 


12,484 


Capital Outlay 


2,875 


Total 


52.928 


INSURANCE 




38. INSURANCE 




Workmens' Compensation 


S 30.000 


Package Insurance 


30.000 


Public Officials Bond 


650 


Fire & Police 


3.700 


Total 


64.350 



39. BENEFITS 

County Retirement System 

Health and Life 

Other 

Total 



S 149.507 

45.000 

194,507 



DEBT SERVICE 

40. DEBT SERVICE 

Payment of Interest S 63,278 

Payment of Principal 393,000 

Total 456,278 

UNCLASSIFIED 

41. RESERVE FUND S 20.000 

42. VETERANS PENSIONS 8,097 

43. BOND ISSUE COSTS 4,000 

44. INTEREST ON TAX ANTICIPATION 35,000 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED 67,097 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 52.158,049 

II. LIBRARY BUDGET 

45. LIBRARY OPERATING 

Salaries & Wages S 44.900 

Expense 14,335 

Capital Outlay — 

Total 59,235 

III. SCHOOL 

46. *SCHOOL BUDGET 

Administration S 73,155 

Instruction 1,938,643 

Other School Services & Athletics 254,412 

Oper. & Maintenance of Plant 266,795 

Fixed Charges 30.245 

Acquisition of Fixed Assets 33.667 

Programs with Other Districts 1 1 ,700 

Encumbrances from Prior Years — 

Total School Budget S 2. 608 ,6 17 

SUMMARY OF BUDGETS I. II. & III S4.825.901 

*Does not include Whittier Vocational 
Expenditure Expended by Special 
Article S 24.300 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to autho- 
rize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue for the financial years beginning January 
1, 1971 and January 1. 1972 in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44. Section 4, 
and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws. Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Moved by Mrs. Cole that the Town authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the selectmen, to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue for the financial years beginning January 1. 
1971 and January 1. 1972 in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws. Chapter 44. Section 4. 
and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws. Chapter 44. Section 17. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote and so stated by the 
Moderator. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will appropriate a 
sum of money for the current expense of the Water 



Department, the same to be paid from revenues by 
the Water Department during the year 1971, and to 
see what action the Town will take in regard to sur- 
plus funds. 

Moved by Mr. Smyth that the sum of $196,498.00 
be appropriated for current expenses of the Water 
Department; the same to be paid from revenue 
received by the water department in 1971, and fur- 
ther, that the sum of $33,332.35 be transferred from 
the water surplus. Seconded. Finance Committee 
recommends. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote 
and so stated by the Moderator. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will appropriate a 
sum of money fur the purpose of promotion of the 
Town of Ipswich, said sum to be matched by an 
equal amount from the Chamber of Commerce. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that $700.00 be appropriated 
to be used in conjunction with a matching sum of the 
Chamber of Commerce of Ipswich for the purpose of 
promotion of the Town of Ipswich. Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommends. Motion carried by voice vote 
and so stated by the Moderator. 

Article 10. To see what action the Town will take 
to the transfer of any surplus funds in the Electric 
Light Department. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the town transfer 
$42,000.00 from the Surplus Account o\ the Electric 
Light Department to the General Fund for the pur- 
pose o\ reducing taxes and that the sum of S200.90 
be transferred from the Surplus Account to the 
Construction Account of the Electric Department. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote and so stated by the 
Moderator. 



Article 11. To see what sum the Town will raise 
and appropriate to pay unpaid bills incurred in pre- 
vious years and remaining unpaid. 

Moved by Mr. Rose that the sum of $4,154.59 be 
appropriated to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous 
years and remaining unpaid as follows: 
Garbage Collection 278.07 

Police - 1969 41.75 

Highway - delivery charge not encumbered 5.28 

Town Manager - Xerox (late bill) 60.00 

Veterans Benefits 3,769.49 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. A 4/5th 
vote is required and so stated by the Moderator. 
Motion carried by an unanimous voice vote and so 
declared by the Moderator. 

Article 12. To hear and act upon the reports of 
Committees, and to continue such committees as the 
Town may vote to continue. 

Mr. Irving Small, chairman of the Government 
Study Committee read report of said committee. He 
moved that the report be accepted and the committee 
be continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. John Conley, Chairman of the Historic Study 
Committee read report of said committee. He moved 
that the report be accepted and the committee be 
continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 



Mr. Harold Nelson, Chairman of the Linebrook 
School Addition Construction Committee read report 
of said committee. He moved that the report be 
accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Harold Nelson, Chairman of the School Building 
Needs Committee read report of said committee. He 
moved that the report be accepted and the committee 
continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mrs. Alice Keenan, Chairman of the Ipswich Mos- 
quito Control Committee read report of said commit- 
tee. She moved that the report be accepted as a 
report of progress and the committee continued. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. John Vincent, Chairman of the MBTA Study 
Committee read report of said committee. He stated 
that railroad transportation services will not cost the 
town anything this year. He moved that the report be 
accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate a sum of money for construction of roads 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro, that the sum of $39,000.00 
be appropriated for the construction of roads under 
Chapter 90 of the General Laws. Seconded. Queries by 
Mr. Fustace were answered by Mr. Navarro who stated 
said funds will be allocated for continuation of Line- 
brook Road reconstruction, only. Finance Committee 
recommends. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote 
and so declared by the Moderator. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate a sum of money for the Maintenance of roads 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Moved by Mr. Smyth that the sum of $4,500 be 
appropriated for the Maintenance of roads under Chap- 
ter 90 of the General Laws. Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommends. In answer to a question, Mr. 
Smyth stated that said funds would be used on 
Chapter 90 roads to make necessary repairs, such as 
filling potholes, etc. on Topsfield Road, Mill Road, 
Linebrook Road and Argilla Road. Motion carried by 
an unanimous voice vote and so stated by the 
Moderator. 

Article 15. To see what action the Town will take 
to appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
laying new water mains and other improvements to 
the water system, and to provide payment by borrow- 
ing or otherwise. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek, that the town appropriate 
$135,000.00 for the laying and relaying of water 
mains not less than six inches in diameter, and that 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to issue $135,000.00 in bonds 
or notes of the Town under General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 8, as amended. Seconded. Recommended 
by the Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen and 
the Planning Board. Bond issued required hand count. 
Motion carried with 793 voting in the affirmative; 6 
voting in the negative. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for constructing addi- 



8 



tions and improvements to the sewage treatment and 
disposal facilities and the sewerage system; and deter- 
mine how the money shall be raised by transfer of 
any available funds or by borrowing or otherwise; and 
to take any action relative thereto, including recision 
of bond authorizations previously made for the same 
project. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the Town raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3,600,000.00 for the con- 
struction of sewers, sewerage system and sewage treat- 
ment and disposal facilities; that to meet this appro- 
priation, the sum of $100,000.00 be transferred from 
Sewer Receipts Reserve, and the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen be authorized to issue 
$3,500,000.00 bonds or notes of the Town under 
Chapter 44, Section 8 (15) of the General Laws as 
amended; and the Town Manager with the approval of 
the Selectmen be authorized to carry out said project 
and to contract for and expend State and Federal 
construction grants for the project providing that such 
State and Federal grants of not less than 80% of the 
amount be made available and providing that the total 
authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount 
of any State or Federal Construction aid, and further, 
that bond authorizations under Article 16, Annual 
Town Meeting, March 1969 is hereby rescinded, and I 
further move that the above motion be voted by 
printed ballot on March 8, 1971 at the same time the 
election of town officers will be held. Seconded. 

Mr. William Zachmann moved to amend the motion 
as follows: "to insert at the end of original motion" 
'However, there shall be no more than one million 
dollars ($1,000,000.00) of bonded indebtedness out- 
standing on this appropriation at any one time.' " 
Seconded. Finance Committee recorded themselves as 
recommending the original motion. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen John S. Bialek 
concurred- with amendment to the motion. Mr. Leland 
Carter spoke against the amendment. Finance Commit- 
tee also recommended approval of the amendment. 

Amendment to the motion carried by voice vote 
and so stated by the Moderator. 

Town Counsel Dale Vincent moved to reconsider 
the amendment. Mr. Fred Paulitz rose to "a point of 
order. Not acknowledged by the Moderator. Mr. 
William Zachmann rose to a point of order. Acknow- 
ledged by the Moderator as to his point of order. Mr. 
Fred Paulitz was then allowed to speak and he stated 
that only a person voting in opposition to the amend- 
ment may be permitted to make a motion for re con 
sideration. 

Mr. Louis Geoffrion inquired as to status of pend- 
ing suit between the Department of Natural Resources 
and the Town of Ipswich with respect to future sewer 
extensions in the Town of Ipswich. Town Counsel 
spoke on case pending. 

At this time, Mr. William Zachmann again rose to a 
point of order. He was not recognized by the Modera- 
tor and was directed to be seated. Mr. Zachmann 
refused to comply with the Moderator's wishes. The 
Moderator then ordered the police officers to remove 
Mr. Zachmann from the meeting. 



Mr. Anthony Klos moved for reconsideration. 
Seconded. Motion to reconsider carried by voice vote. 

Town Counsel informed the assembly that if an 
affirmative vote was received on the Amendment, it 
might defeat the original motion. 

At the time, Attorney Terrance Perkins requested a 
three-minute recess. Assembly opposed a call for 
recess. 

Vote on the amendment indicated four voting in 
the affirmative; 669, opposed. Amendment defeated. 

The main motion on Article 16 was carried by 
unanimous voice vote, and so stated by the Moderator. 

Article 17. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the town's share of the 
Whittier Regional Vocational School District annual 
planning and administration expenses. 

Moved by Mr. Robert Weatherall, that the town 
raise and appropriate the sum of $24,300.00 to pay 
the town's apportioned share of the capital and 
operating expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District for the year 1971. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. Motion 
carried by an unanimous voice vote and so declared 
by the Moderator. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to pur- 
chase a piece of land with the building thereon, 
known as the Heard Property, bounded and described 
as follows: Northeasterly, southeasterly, southwesterly 
and southerly by other land of the Town of Ipswich, 
and westerly by South Main Street, said land more 
particularly described in a Plan by T.A. Appleton 
(1935) Plan No. 340-G, Plan Cert. No. 10648 and 
recorded in the Registry of Deeds, and to appropriate 
a sum of money therefor and to take any other 
actions in respect thereto. 




TOWN MODERATOR - Harry Monro 



Moved by Mr. Navarro that the sum of $32,040.00 
be appropriated to purchase a piece of land with the 
building thereon, known as the Heard Property, bound- 
ed and described as follows: Northeasterly, south- 
easterly, southwesterly and southerly by other land of 
the Town of Ipswich, and westerly by South Main 
Street, said land more particularly described in a Plan 
by T. A. Appleton (1935), Plan No. 340-G, Plan Cert. 
No. 10648 and recorded in the Registry of Deeds, and 
to appropriate a sum of money therefor and to take 
any other actions in respect thereto. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommends. Questions asked by 
interested parties were answered by town officials who 
stated that the land will be used for future expansion 
of administrative facilities. There are no plans at this 
time as to relocating or the demolition of the building 
presently on the lot. The asking price is identical to 
the valuation of the property as taken from the latest 
valuation list in the assessor's records. The motion 
received approval via a voice vote; however, town 
counsel suggested that a hand count be taken which 
indicated 629 voting in the affirmative; 62, opposed. 
Moderator declared the motion carried. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to update 
the Master Plan and to appropriate a sum of money 
for that purpose. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the town raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 1 1 ,000 for the purpose of 
reviewing and revising the Ipswich Comprehensive Plan. 
Seconded. Planning Board and the Finance Committee 
recommended the motion. Chairman of the Planning 
Board John Prosser spoke in favor of the motion. 
Motion carried by hand count which indicated 620 
voting in the affirmative; 63 opposed. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to supplement Article 15 
of the ATM 1969 for sewer construction. 

Moved by Mr. Smyth, that the sum of $3,500.00 
be appropriated to supplement Article 15 of the 1969 
Annual Town Meeting for Sewer Construction. Second- 
ed. Mr. Smyth explained that funds would be 
expended for sewerage installed on Wayne Avenue, 
Lafayette Road, Perley Avenue and Topsfield Road. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote and so 
declared by the Moderator. 

Article 21. To see what action the Town will take 
to appropriate a sum of money to compensate land 
owners for proposed takings under Eminent Domain in 
accordance with Chapter 79 of the General Laws 
resulting from the widening and rebuilding of Line- 
brook road, and to take any further action in respect 
thereto. 

Moved by Mrs. Cole that the town vote to appro- 
priate the sum of $3,000.00; said money to be used 
by the Board of Selectmen to compensate land owners 
for proposed takings under Eminent Domain in accord- 
ance with Chapter 79 of the General Laws resulting 
from the widening and rebuilding of Linebrook Road. 
Mrs. Cole explained the motion. Motion recommended 
by the Finance Committee and the Board of Select- 
men. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote and so 
declared by the Moderator. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Conservation Commission to secure from the United 



States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation 
Service, a detailed soil survey for the Town of 
Ipswich, including an interpretive report, and to see if 
the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $6,245.00 for that purpose. 

Moved by Mr. Cobb that the article be indefinitely 
postponed. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 and transfer the 
same to the Conservation Fund. 

Moved by Mr. Cobb that the article be indefinitely 
postponed. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for use by the 
School Building Needs Committee in the planning of 
additional school housing. 

Moved by Mr. Harold J. Nelson that the town raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 for use by the 
School Building Needs Committee in the planning of 
additional school housing. Seconded. Motion received 
approval of the finance committee. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote and so stated by the Moderator. 

Article 25. To see if the Town will accept the provisions 
of the acts of 1970, Chapter 835 which amends General 
Laws Chapter 41 and adds Section 108L entitled: Career 
Incentive Pay Program. 

Moved by Chief Armand Brouillette that the town accept 
the provisions of G.L., Ch. 41, Section 108L as recently 
amended entitled Career Incentive Pay Program, which law 
reads as follows: 

Section 108L. Career Incentive Pay Program. 

There is hereby established a career incentive pay 
program offering base salary increases to regular full-time 
members of the various city and town police departments, 
the division of state police in the department of public 
safety, the capitol police and the metropolitan district 
commission police, as a reward for furthering their 
education in the field of police work. 

Police career incentive base salary increases shall be 
predicated on the accumulation of points earned in the 
following manner: one point for each semester hour credit 
earned toward a baccalaureate or an associate degree; sixty 
points for an associate degree; one hundred and twenty 
points for a baccalaureate degree; and one hundred and 
fifty points for a degree of master or for a degree in law. All 
semester credits and degrees shall be earned in an 
educational institution accredited by the New England 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools or by the 
Board of Higher Education. 

Base salary increases authorized by this section shall be 
granted in the following manner: a three per cent increase 
for ten points so accumulated, a six per cent increase for 
twenty-five points, a ten per cent increase for forty points, 
a fifteen per cent increase for sixty points, a twenty per 
cent increase for one hundred and twenty points, and a 
thirty per cent increase for one hundred and fifty points so 
accumulated. 

Any city or town which accepts the provisions of this 
section and provides career incentive salary increases for 



10 



police officers shall be reinbursed by the commonwealth 
for one half the cost of such payments upon certification 
by the board of higher education. The board of higher 
education shall certify the amount of such reimbursement 
to be paid to such city or town from information filed on 
or before September the first of each year with said board; 
on a form furnished by it, by the chief of police, or one of 
similar rank, of the city or town police department. The 
board of higher education shall also certify the amount of 
the career incentive salary increases to be allocated to the 
state police, from information filed with said board on or 
before September the first of each year by the 
commissioner of public safety for the state police, by the 
commissioner of the metropolitan district commission for 
the metropolitan district commission police, and by the 
chief of the capitol police for the capitol police. Said 
information shall be filed on a form to be furnished by the 
board of higher education. (Added by 1970, 835, approved 
August 28, 1970, effective 90 days thereafter.) And to raise 
and assess a sum of $3,811.50 to be added to the police 
budget for the year 1971 to implement the requirements of 
above law. 

Seconded. 

Chief Brouillette, in detail, explained merits of statute 
acceptance and strongly urged the support of the meeting. 
Motion received favorable recommendation of the Board of 
Selectmen and the finance committee. Motion carried by an 
unanimous voice vote. 

Article 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money for the purchase of new portable bleachers 
and installation thereof at the High School Athletic Field 
and appropriate the sum of $3600.00 for same. 

Moved by Mr. Andrew Alexson that the article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money for the purchase and erection of a fence to 
enclose the High School Athletic Field and to appropriate 
the sum of $4500.00 for same. 

Moved by Mr. Andrew Alexson that the article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote . 

Article 28. To see what action the Town will take 
relative to extending the Sanitary Sewer to Fairview 
Avenue and to provide for the payment thereof by 
borrowing or otherwise. 

Moved by Mr. John Bialek that the article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

Article 29. To see whether the Town will 
appropriate a sum of money for sewers and sewage 
systems to extend the existing sanitary sewer system 
southerly in accordance with the "Report on Sewerage 
and Sewage Disposal, July, 1961 by Camp, Dresser 
and McKee, Consulting Engineers, Boston, Mass., and 
that sewers be extended in streets and in private 
property, in general, as indicated in the above report, 
to serve the following: County Road from Ward 
Street to Masconomet Road; cross country along 
Saltonstall Brook and along Ipswich River, South Main 
street to Upper River Road; Essex Road from County 
Road to high point; Masconomet Road; Beechwood 



Road; South Main Street; Southern Heights; Southern 
Manor; and Upper River Road; and to make such 
modifications to the existing system as are required; 
and that the Selectmen be authorized to acquire by 
purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, land and-or 
eastments as required for the purpose of construction 
of this sewer extension; and that the Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen be authorized to 
borrow money under General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 8 (15) as amended. 

Moved by Mr. Harris Smith that the Town raise and 
appropriate $50,000 to secure construction plans and 
specifications for sewers and sewage systems to extend 
the existing sanitary sewer system southerly in 
accordance with the "Report on Sewerage and Sewage 
Disposal, July, 1961, by Camp, Dresser and McKee, 
Consulting Engineers, Boston, Mass., and that sewers 
be extended in streets and in private property, in 
general, as indicated in the above report, to serve the 
following: County Road from Ward Street to 
Masconomet Road; cross country along Saltonstall 
Brook and along Ipswich River, South Main Street to 
Upper River Road; Essex Road from County Road to 
high point; Masconomet Road; Beechwood Road; 
South Main Street; Southern Heights; Southern Manor; 
and Upper River Road; and to make such 
modifications of the existing system as are required. 
Seconded. Mr. Smith gave a detailed explanation of 
the article. Recorded in opposition were the Planning 
Board, Board of Selectmen and the Finance 
Committee. Hand count recorded 65 in the affirmative; 
561, opposed. Motion defeated and so declared by the 
Moderator. 

Article 30. To see if the Town will direct the 
School Committee of the Town of Ipswich or a Select 
Committee appointed by the Moderator, to study and 
investigate the advantages and/or disadvantages to the 
Town that would result from the Town adopting the 
so-called "45-15" school year plan and to require that 
a report be made to the Town within a reasonable 
period, but not later than 1 June 1971 by means of 
a public forum or other suitable meeting. 

Moved by Mr. Louis Geoffrion to direct the School 
Committee of the Town of Ipswich to study and 
investigate the advantages and/or disadvantages to the 
Town that would result from the Town adopting the 
so-called "45-15" school year plan and to report their 
findings to the Town by means of a public forum not 
later than 1 June 1971. Seconded. Mr. Geoffrion 
spoke on the article. Chairman of the School 
Committee George Geanakos stated that he felt action 
from town meeting was not necessary; that the school 
committee will study this plan without direction from 
a town meeting. Recorded as opposed to this motion 
was the finance committee. Mr. Torrey Jackson moved 
to amend the motion as follows: to see if the town 
will direct the school committee of the Town of 
Ipswich to study and investigate the advantages and/or 
disadvantages to the town, that would result from the 
town adopting the so-called "45-15" school year plan 
and to require that a report be made to the town 
within a responsible period, but not later than June 1, 
1971 by means of a public forum or other suitable 
meeting. Seconded. Amendment lost by voice vote. 
Original Motion defeated by a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 31. Request that the RB zone shown on the 
September 1957 Ipswich Zoning Map, and which 



11 



encompasses Newmarch Street and its side streets, as 
well as part of Sawyer Street and Part of Jeffreys 
Neck Road, be changed to an RRA zone. 

Moved by Mrs. Sharon M. Josephson that the town 
vote to amend the Zoning District Map of the Town 
of Ipswich, Massachusetts, dated September, 1957, as 
amended, and on file in the Town Clerk's office by 
changing from RB zone to RRA zone all the area 
presently shown as RB zone containing Newmarch 
Street, Spillers Lane, Nabby's Point Road, Cameron 
Avenue, Damon Avenue, Jurdin Hill Road, Marshview 
Road, Arrowhead Trail, Applewood Drive, Agawam 
Avenue, the east side of Wainwright Street, Sawyer 
Street, Cogswell Street and part of East Street and the 
part of Jeffreys Neck Road shown by said map to 
within said RB area. The report of the planning board 
was filed with the town clerk indicating board's 
support of the citizen's petition and accordingly 
recommends the motion to amend the zoning by-law. 
Also recommending in favor of the motion were the 
Conservation Commission and the Board of Health. 
Motion carried by 742 voting in the affirmative; 7, 
opposed. 

Article 32. To see what action the town will take 
relative to approving the concept of having a Nuclear 
Electric generation facility constructed on land owned 
by the town of Ipswich generally known as the old 
town farm. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the Town express its 
interest regarding the concept of a nuclear generating 
facility in the Town of Ipswich and that town 
encourage further investigation into the question of 
such a facility, provided that no such vote shall* be 
interpreted as endorsement of any proposed legislation, 
and it is further understood that MEPP legislation, 
insofar as it affects Ipswich will not be submitted 
without the approval of the Board of Selectmen, the 
Town Manager, the Nuclear Power Plan Advisory 
Committee, and Town Counsel and that any such 
legislation shall contain the requirement that a vote be 
cast by the Town before any such plant may be built. 
Seconded. In a question from Mr. Bialek to town 
counsel, it was answered that the motion as given 
does not commit the town to any obligation. Mrs. 
Siegel of the League of Women Voters asked if the 
Nuclear Power Study Committee had taken a vote on 
said motion. Mr. Masse of said committee answered 
that the advisory committee is not an official town 
committee — its role being to advise the selectmen 
and > that action of the Selectmen takes precedence. He 
further explained that there will be two more votes 
before the town can be committed to such a facility. 

Finance Committee recorded themselves as in favor 
of the motion. Mr. Gary Hull, Eagle Hill, spoke in 
opposition to the motion. Mr. Charles K. Cobb, Jr., 
chairman of the Conservation Commission, moved for 
indefinite postponement of the article. Seconded. He 
presented views which predicated the motion. Mrs. 
Betty Siegel of the League of Women Voters stated 
that the League is not against further study of a 
nuclear plant, but it feels that the town does not 
need a directive from town meeting to pursue such a 
course. Mr. Alexander Sweenie spoke for indefinite 
postponement. Mr. John Pechilis, spokesman for and 
representative of Ipswich to MEPP strongly urged the 
people to vote for the article and in detail presented 



MEPP's views. Mr. Philip Stewart moved the question 
to cut off debate. A 2/3's vote was required to 
accomplish said motion. Hand count showed 479 
voting in the affirmative, 197 opposed; 452 needed for 
passage. Motion carried. Hand Count on motion to 
indefinitely postpone the article showed 475 voting in 
the affirmative; 281, opposed. Motion for 
postponement was carried and so declared by the 
Moderator. 

Article 33. To see what action the town will take 
relative to accepting proposals for the development of 
a Nuclear Electric Generating Facility on land now, or 
formerly, owned by the Town of Ipswich. 

Moved by Mr. Pechilis that the article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. 

Article 34. To ask the Town to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $6,000 (Six Thousand Dollars) 
in order to purchase the necessary materials, 
equipment and labor to alleviate the severe mosquito 
problem. Such program to be conducted by the Town 
Forestry Department for nine weeks during the 
summer and to be totally independent of the Essex 
County Mosquito Control Project. 

Moved by Mr. James Brett that the town raise and 
appropriate the sum of $6,000 in order to purchase 
the necessary equipment, materials and labor to 
alleviate the severe mosquito problem. Such program 
to be conducted by the Town Forestry Department 
for nine weeks during the summer and to be totally 
independent of the Essex County Mosquito Control 
Project. Seconded. Mr. Scudder of the finance 
committee stated that the finance committee does not 
recommend this article, with the exception of Mr. Paul 
Gahm who spoke in defense of said motion. The 
motion to move the question carried by voice vote. 
Passage of the article required a 2/3 vote (favorable) 
to over-ride the "not recommended" of the finance 
committee. Motion carried by a hand count of 455 in 
the affirmative; 203 in the negative; a total of 442 
affirmative votes required for a 2/3 vote. 

Article 35. To see if the Town will adopt the 
following by-law: Except where expressly prohibited by 
law, all abatements and re -evaluations granted on or 
relating to real and personal property located within 
the Town of Ipswich shall be made the subject of a 
list published in the annual report of the Town for 
the year in which the granting takes place and effect. 
Each of the subjects so entered shall include the 
dollar amounts of the abatements and re-evaluations 
and shall identify as to location and ownership the 
particular real property on which the granting takes 
effect. 

Moved by Attorney Arthur Ross that the town 
adopt the following by-law: Except where expressly 
prohibited by law, all abatements and re -evaluations 
granted on or relating to real and personal property 
located within the Town of Ipswich shall be made the 
subject of a list published in the annual report of the 
Town for the year in which the granting takes place 
and effect. Each of the subjects so entered shall 
include the dollar amounts of the abatements and 
re-evaluations and shall identify as to location and 
ownership the particular property on which the 



12 



granting takes effect. Seconded. Attorney Ross spoke 
on the article. Finance Committee recommended 
against adoption of the by-law. Board of Selectmen 
opposed to said by-law. Mr. Louis Geoffrion registered 
his opposition to motion. A majority vote is needed 
to pass a by-law. The article is defeated by a hand 
count showing 73 in favor of the motion; 474, 
opposed, and so declared by the Moderator. 

Article 36. To see what action the Town of 
Ipswich will take regarding the extension of the 
sewage disposal system along County Road from the 
location of the present sewage disposal system as far 
as Lakeman's Lane for the benefit of houses and 
buildings abutting on County Road and houses in the 
so-called Masconomet Area. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the article be indefinitely 
postponed. Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous 
voice vote. 



BALLOTING DAY 
MONDAY, MARCH 8, 1971 

ARTICLE 16 

The ballots were prepared by the Moderator and 
Town Clerk, in accordance with the Town By-Laws. 

The result of the ballot vote was as follows: 



Yes 


2,681 


No 


901 


Blanks 


205 


TOTAL 


3,787 



A 2/3 vote of 2,524 was required. The motion 
carried. 

ATTEST: 



Motion made and seconded that the meeting be 
dissolved. Carried by voice vote. 

Meeting dissolved and so declared by Moderator. 
Meeting dissolved at 11:10 p.m. 

ATTEST: 

Anthony A. Murawski 
Town Clerk 



Anthony A. Murawski 
Town Clerk 



"Selectman Chairman, Joseph Navarro stands with 

John Stammers and Dave Hearsum, both from 

Ipswich, England during their visit to Ipswich, 
Mass. " 




13 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman 
John S. Bialek 
Elizateth S. Cole 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Paul J. Gillespie 



This past year saw Town Manager Charter retained 
by a substantial margin. We are pleased to report that 
the Manager has continued to work in a most 
cooperative manner with the Board of Selectmen. In 
addition, we have received excellent cooperation from 
all the Boards and Committees of the Town which has 
made our task that much easier. 

We are proceeding with the design and eventually 
the construction of our much needed Secondary Sewer 
Treatment Plant. This not only fulfills the State 
requirements, but we believe it is a step toward the 
protection of our precious environment. After a years 
delay, we have also been allowed by the State 
Authorities to continue with our Sewer Extension 
program. This has taken place in the Turkey Shore 
Road area and will be most beneficial in combating 
pollution of the river. 

Our street repair and improvement program is 
continuing as manpower and funds become available. 
We intend to continue this program on a yearly basis 
in order to insure all of your decent roads to travel 
upon. 

The easements for the Farley Brook project have 
been obtained at long last, and we expect the project 



to commence shortly. This will eliminate many 
problems in the surrounding areas. 

Due to changes in the appropriate state statutes, 

Ipswich received a number of additional Liquor 

Licenses. Most of these have been granted at this 
time. 

The Board has formed a committee to study the so 
called open space program and to report on the 
effects such a program would have in Ipswich. 

The Board of Selectmen, along with other interested 
persons, paid visits early in the year to Haddam Neck 
in Connecticut and to Plymouth, Mass. to observe first 
hand the Nuclear Power Plants located in those 
communities. We have also had meetings in Boston 
with the Water Resources Division relative to the 
location of a regional reservoir in Ipswich. 

We would like to thank the Girl Scouts of Ipswich 
for their participation in the Annual Clean Up Week. 
Also the young people in the schools who have taken 
part in various programs such as the cleaning of the 
river. This type of activity is much appreciated by the 
entire community. 



14 



Names Remaining on 1971 List as Prepared by the Board of Selectmen. New List To be Compiled in 1972. 



MALE 

Phillip Abell 

Abell Avenue 
Charles D. Coulouras 

10 Fourth Street 
James E. Cunningham, Sr. 

3 Goldfinch Way 
Stanley Eustace 

High Street 
Douglas Holland 

North Ridge Road 
David G. Kennedy 

102 High Street 
Ignatius Krol 

7 Congress Street 
Walter S. Kuconis 

168 Linebrook Road 
Eugene Matheson 

21 North Main Street 
Harry Mayo 

13 South Main Street 
Homer L. Mohr 

25 Edge Street 



Joseph W. Morin 

16 Lafayette Road 
Edward Oxner 

Howe Street 
Charles Pelletier 

85 Topsfield Road 
Alex Poirier 

5 Oakhurst Avenue 
Charles A. Richard 

84 Linebrook Road 
William E. Sturgis 

County Road 
John G. Thatcher, Jr. 

43 Upper River Road 
Wilbert L. Tozier 

Colby Road 
Brainard C. Wallace 

56 North Main Street 



FEMALE 

Helen E. Carter 

20 Masconomet Road 
Carol Chambers 

4 Linden Street 
Elsie F. Eustace 

83 Essex Road 
Hazel L. Grant 

7 Argilla Road 
Diana F. Lloyd 

143 Argilla Road 
Marguerite S. McDade 

33 Jeffreys Neck Road 
Janice L. Marcorelle 

21 Estes Street 
Marian Reedy 

25 Kimball Avenue 
Barbara L. Skeffington 

39 Newmarch Street 
Harriette F. White 

52 High Street 
Gladys Woodman 

Kimball Avenue 



List of Jurors Drawn in 1971 



Joseph Arcisz 

18 Liberty Street 
George J. Bouzianis 

13 Congress Street 
Vincent H. Boylan 

27 Mineral Street 
Joseph V. Burns 

3 Wayne Avenue 
Walter L. Campbell 

Labor-in-Vain Road 
Arthur L. Cole 

Chaplin's Terrace 
James E. Cunningham, Jr 

47 Skytop Road 
Edwin H. Damon 

Eagle Hill 
Clifton Duff 

Pine Street 
Andrew Gianakakis 

High Street 
Russell M. Grant 

7 Argilla Road 
Frederick Gresch 

10 Maple Avenue 
Gregory Logan 

7 Riverside Drive 
Kenneth McMullen 

64B Argilla Road 

Joseph 
2A 



Peter J. Markos 

Pine Swamp Road 
Charles L. Rose 

37 Jeffreys Neck Road 
Donald R. Skeffington 

Newmarch Street 
Chester L. Stone 

47 County Street 
Clifton Wentworth 

9 Pleasant Street 
Peter A. Zervas 

7 Liberty Street 
Cora B. Baker 

113 County Road 
Louise Ciolek 

19 Warner Road 
Mildred T. Clogston 

5 Ward Street 
Joan Cudhea 

28 Water Street • 
C. Doris Kirkland 

18 Newmarch Street 
Hazel I. Low 

6 Lafayette Road 
Mary T. Morency 

19 Upper River Road 
Gilda O. Ryan 

9 Fairview Avenue 
ine M. Orsini 
Summer Street 



15 



PLANNING BOARD 



111, Chairman 



William H. Davis, 
John P. Prosser 
William L. Thoen 
George A. Nikas 
Jason A. Sokolov 



During the past year the Planning Board continued 
to hold regular bi-weekly public meetings. In addition, 
many special meetings and "field trips" were required 
to take care of the increase in subdivision activity. 

The Board directed much of its activity toward the 
study and application of additional controls over both 
existing and proposed subdivisions. A standard 
contractual agreement was prepared and approved 
which would give the Town additional financial control 
over developers in the event of default or the 
abandonment of a subdivision. 

The A. B. Clark and the Meadowbrook subdivisions 
continued to expand as expected. Although plans were 
discussed with several new developers, none were 
approved. 

The need for an updated Master Plan has been 
apparent for some time, and after Town Meeting 
approval of an initial expenditure of SI 1,000 for the 
first year's study, the Board began to investigate pro- 
spective Master Plan consultants. Several were inter- 
viewed and re-interviewed, and after careful considera- 
tion the firm of Nash-Vigier, Inc., was selected. 

The consultant-guided citizen committee concept of 
master planning will be utilized, with the participation 
of volunteers from all town committees and organiza- 
tions as well as interested individual citizens. This 
Master Committee will be composed of subcommittees 
which will be working as well as advisory — 

committees. They will conduct surveys within the 
Town, evaluate community facilities and sites, prepare 
maps, etc. In addition, two other roles of the commit- 
tees will be: (a) to indicate priority issues from the 
Town's point of view and make recommendations with 



respect to the planning program; and (b) to maintain 
liaison between the planning program and other 
interested boards and private groups in the Town. 

The Consultant will conduct a Town survey to 
determine the opinions of the townspeople concerning 
their ideas of needs and priorities for planning. He 
will also prepare periodic news releases to provide 
adequate public information concerning the planning 
program. Major areas of study will be land develop- 
ment trends, open space, zoning, utilities (sewer, water, 
fire station, recreation, etc.) traffic, etc. The Planning 
Board cannot emphasize too strongly how important it 
is that as many citizens as possible participate in this 
program. All volunteers are welcome. 

The Planned Community Development District was 
again given a great deal of additional study by the 
Board. The developer appeared before the Board on a 
number of occasions in an effort to reach or establish 
mutual understanding and preliminary agreement prior 
to the re-submission of his preliminary plan. Consider- 
able progress was made in tins direction, and it is 
expected that a new submission will be forthcoming 
that will be more beneficial to the Town. 

It appeared that Board meetings were somewhat 
better attended than those of last year, and we wish 
to encourage all townspeople to participate more 
actively so that our planning will be as comprehensive 
as possible. 

Zoning maps and copies of the Protective Zoning 

By-Laws have been made available to the general 

public (for a small fee) and may be obtained at the 
Town Clerk's office. 

The Board wishes to express its appreciation to the 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Industrial 
Development Committee, Conservation Committee, 
Board of Appeals and the Town Manager for their 
cooperation during the past year; also to Mr. Donald 
Gagnon, our Inspector of Subdivisions, and to our 
capable secretary, Mrs. Frances A. Moon. 




16 




New Voter 



TOWN CLERK 
Harold G. Comeau 

Comparative vital statistics 
four years are as follows: 



recorded for the past 



Births 

Deaths 

Marriages 



1968 
217 
123 
113 



1969 
195 
129 
125 



1970 
154 
109 
131 



1971 
149 
141 
121 



All the births recorded were to Ipswich residents. 
Of the total number of deaths recorded, 100 were 
Ipswich residents. The age of the oldest Ipswich resi- 
dent was 94 years, 7 months, 4 days. 

REVENUE: 



Turned into the Town treasury: 

Dog Licenses 
Marriage Licenses 
Certified copies 
Recordings 
Gas renewals 
Clam Permits 
Miscellaneous 
TOTAL 

Turned into the Division of 
Fisheries and Game 



1970 


1971 


$1,527.25 


$2,826.70 


266.00 


236.00 


112.00 


338.00 


1,662.00 


1,744.50 


6.00 


7.00 


6,230.00 


6,205.00 


83.00 


194.00 


$9,886.25 


$11,469.00 


$2,239.00 


$2,413.50 



LICENSES: 



Dog: 



1970 



Males 


409 


Females 


67 


Spayed Females 


248 


Kennels: $10.00 


1 


$25.00 


2 


TOTAL 


727 


CLAM PERMITS 






1970 


Residents 


679 


Non-Residents: Daily 


523 


Yearly 


215 


TOTAL 


1,417 


FISH & GAME 






1970 


Fishing, Regular 


156 


Fishing, Minor 


31 


Fishing, Female 


15 


Fishing, Non-resident 


2 


Hunting, resident 


184 


Hunting, Non-resident 




Sporting, Regular 


53 


Sporting, Free 


31 


Sporting, Military Free Resident 




Trapping, Regular 


5 


Trapping, Minor 


1 


Archery Stamps 


3 


Duplicate Licenses 


2 


TOTAL 


483 



1971 

509 
135 

324 
2 
3 

973 

1971 

817 

418 

210 

1,445 

1971 

147 

27 

25 

3 

144 

3 

82 

32 

9 

4 

2 

2 

6 

486 



REGISTERED VOTERS: 5751 



17 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

Julius J. Kaszuba 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 

Thaddeus A. Maciejowski 

S. Harold Perley 

Clarence F. Richter - Associate Member 

Ho Hie A. Bucklin, Jr. - Associate Member 

The Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to act 
on only three types of requests: 1) a petition for a 
Variance from the Ipswich Zoning By-law; 2) a request 
for a Special Exception as specifically provided in the 
Zoning By-law; and 3) an Appeal from a decision of 
the Building Inspector. An appeal from a decision of 
the Building Inspector usually involves only an inter- 
pretation of the Ipswich Zoning By-law or of the 
Zoning Laws of Massachusetts. 

In the case of a Special Exception, the Zoning 
By-law permits such a use but only when "authorized 
by the Board of Appeals in each specific case". Exam- 
ples of Special Exceptions are: apartment houses in 
General Residence Districts and Intown Residence Dis- 
tricts. 

A request for a Variance, however, is a request to 
deviate from the Zoning By-law. It can only be grant- 
ed after the petitioner has proven, to the satisfaction 
of the Board of Appeals, the following: 1) that 
granting the request will not substantially derogate 
from the intent of the Zoning By-law; 2) that it will 



not be detrimental to the public good; and 3) that 
there are conditions especially affecting the petitioner's 
property, but not affecting generally the zoning district 
in which the property is located, so that literal 
enforcement of the Zoning By-law would involve sub- 
stantial hardship, financial or otherwise, to the 
petitioner. 

In 1971 the Board held nineteen duly advertised 
public hearings. Of the nineteen petitions, ten were 
granted, six were denied, and three were withdrawn. 
Of the ten petitions granted, six were variances and 
four were special exceptions. 

The petitions that were granted involved the follow- 
ing: an antique restoration establishment in an Old 
and Historic Colonial District; a retail produce store in 
a General Business District; two requests for porches 
closer to lot lines than allowed by the By-law; a third 
apartment in a residential dwelling; a request to keep 
horses for family use; expansion of a business building 
into the rear yard; a garage closer to the lot line than 
allowed; and a request relating to the sale of beer and 
wine in a retail store. 

The petitions that were denied are as follows: an 
addition to a house that would violate yard require- 
ments; two requests concerning business signs; a 
request to build a house on a small non-conforming 
lot; apartment house having more apartments than per 
mitted by the By-law; and a request relating to the 
sale of beer and wine in a retail store in an Old and 
Historic Colonial District. 



"Town Manager and Forestry Employee watch the annual planting of small trees by children during 
Arbor Day ceremonies. " 




18 




TOWN MANAGER 
Richard N. Conti 



If you will remember in last years Annual Report I 
made an attempt to identify various goals for 
attainment for 1971 or shortly thereafter. Certainly 
there were more suggested goals than those that were 
attained in 1971, however, I am satisfied that the 
following goals and level of achievements were 
attained. 

1. Resolution of the Town's ambulance problems. 
Presently the Town utilizes a private ambulance 
facility for emergency calls and has assumed 
responsibility for bonafide unpaid ambulance bills. 
This satisfies the spirit of the Town by-law 
guaranteeing free ambulance service within the 
confines of the Town for all citizens. 

2. The new Sewerage Treatment Plant was authorized 
by action of Town Meeting and reaffirmed at the 
Annual Town election. Thus the Town has complied 
with the state mandate to upgrade the Sewage 
Treatment Plant. Additional attention to the Solid 
Waste Problem was generated with the advent of a 
recycling effort within the Town. With the 
cooperation of ecology minded citizens, high school 
students and our housewives, we have the beginning 
of a program which should make an impact on the 
life expectancy of our town dump. 

3. Progressive clam flat development was continued 
through the efforts of the Shellfish Advisory Board 
and Shellfish Constable, Arthur Moon. Active mussel 
dredging and algae raking programs were undertaken 
throughout the year. These will be continued as 
part of the ongoing management of the clam flats. 

4. The Town's tourist attraction effort received a large 
boost with the advent of Olde Ipswich Days. 
Through the efforts of the Chamber of Commerce, 
Churches, Clubs, Interested Citizens and Merchants, 
the community was made attractive to visitors. This 
certainly had an impact on sales and fund raising, 
efforts by clubs and churches. 

5. The Town's central garage operation moved into full 
swing during 1971. We are now capable of handling 



the majority of repairs on all vehicles, and of 
purchasing parts and supplies in a coordinated and 
centralized fashion. 

6. With the creation of an Investigator in the Police 
Department, the Town has enhanced its public 
safety effort in following up detected crimes. This 
supports court actions and deters future criminal 
acts. 

7. The central business district has grown. Many vacant 
stores have been filled, which adds to the shopping 
selection for residents and a total economic growth 
of the community. 

8. Efforts to relieve the unemployment in Town were 
given a boost with the passage of the Federal 
Emergency Employment Act. The Act provided 
eleven jobs for the Town. These positions have 
been filled with unemployed persons who are 
working in the Police Deapartment, Public Works 
Department, Electric Department and the School 
Department. 

During 1971 there were a number of note -worthy 
happenings. The Town was fortunate in acquiring, on 
a no-cost basis, two administrative interns; David Rome 
and Timothy Futrell. Tim came to the Town under a 
program conducted by the Department of Community 
Affairs. David was funded by a manpower program 
under Action, Inc. Both individuals did extensive 
research work and participated in many projects 
conducted during the year. 

An unfortunate suicide in our previously outdated 
jail has stimulated the community to initiate the 
construction of a new facility. 

A request by the Outer Linebrook Association for 
some additional fire protection has evolved into the 
establishment of a neighborhood fire fighting effort. 
Approximately 25 volunteers were sworn in as 
Auxiliary Firemen. It is our intention to locate a 
piece of back-up fire apparatus in the Outer Linebrook 
area, so that the local Auxiliary Fire Fighters can 
respond in advance of our Fire Department. 

A very significant citizens participation activity, 
under the direction of the League of Women Voters, 
was instrumental in revising our voting list. 
Approximately four weeks of continuous volunteer 
effort was required in researching the authenticity of 
registered voters and new voters. 

Some of the most important activities are yet to be 
experienced by the Town. It is extremely important 
that all of the citizens of the Town know where we 
are going in the near and far future. During this year, 
efforts will be made to develop a comprehensive 
master plan, utilizing the efforts of participating 
citizens. The planning efforts of the Town will never 
be successful unless the people participate in these 
efforts. It is intended that the new planning 
consultants, Nash-Vigier, Inc., will work closely with 
the Master Plan Committee and the satellite working 
subcommittees. It is hoped that all interests can be 
represented on the Master Plan Committee. The 
planning consultants will act as a catalytic agent, 
guiding the working subcommittees and the overall 
comprehensive master plan effort. 



19 




"David S. Rome 
worked in the 
Town Manager's 
Office in the ca- 
pacity of Adminis- 
trative Intern from 
May, 1971 until 
January, 1972. 
David was mainly 
involved in the 
Town 's Recycling 
Program, Revising 
the Voting List, 
Emergency Employ- 
ment Act, and citi- 
zen complaints in 
addition to routine 
Town government 
work. " 



I urge anyone who feels that they have the extra 
time, expertise, and interest to come forward in this 
community effort. I hope that the coming year will 
produce solutions regarding the Town's Water 
problems. The Town is in a unique position in which 
it must consider both short-range and long-range 
solutions simultaneously. 

It is planned during the coming two years to 
completely sewer the central part of the Town. This 
should relieve many pollution problems and greatly 
enhance individual properties which are experiencing 
septic systems difficulty. 



This year, again, for your convenience, the financial 
report is in a separate, distinctly colored section for 
ready reference. 




All the general financial records of the Town are 
maintained in this office. Our devoted employees pro- 
cess all payrolls and bill vouchers of every department. 

The annual budget, both preliminary and final, was 
prepared and distributed. 

Various reports were prepared for the following: 
Bureau of Accounts, State Tax Commission, Bureau of 
Census-Federal, Various Banks, Town Departments and 
Committees, research bureaus and other financial insti- 
tutions showing the complete financial transactions and 
condition of the Town. 

On July 31 the State Auditors arrived and 
commenced their periodic audit of the Town's 
finances. 



FINANCE DIRECTOR AND TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Robert H. Leet 

The Accounting Department performs many varied 
functions during the year, which are very necessary 
and important in maintaining the Town's stability. 



About the first of December we moved from our 
quarters on the first floor to the second floor, 
formerly occupied by the Welfare Department. This 
provided us with space we badly needed. 

Detailed financial statements for the year 1971 are 
set forth in the colored pages of this report. 



TREASURER-COLLECTOR 
George C. Mourikas 

The following bills were sent out: 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Farm Animal Excise 
Sewer Betterment 



Check Register Balances were reconciled with Bank 
Statements. 

Federal and State Withholding Tax Statements were 
distributed. 

A Record of Trust Fund transactions was main- 
tained. A schedule of Receipts was rendered to the 
Town Accountant monthly. 

The Treasurer's Office is the Nerve Center of the 
Town and must accept all responsibilities, under the 
Statute General Laws of Massachusetts. 



20 



ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Varnum S. Pedrick 

Assessments: The total assessed value of real estate 
and personal property committed to the collectors 
office for collection in 1971 was $64,570,047. This 
represents an increase to widen our tax base of 
$1,669,500 which helped us to maintain our tax rate 
by saving us about $2.60 per $1,000 assessed value. 



Our office also committed to the collector for 
collection, 7,587 motor vehicle excise tax bills which 
added over $325,000 to our Town Treasury. 



We received from the building inspector 150 
building permits for new construction or remodeling, 
these should make a very substantial addition to our 
overall valuation for the ensuing year. 



TOWN COUNSEL 



F. Dale Vincent 



The number of cases in active litigation was 
reduced during the past year. The suit for a declara- 
tory judgement against the Town, the Selectmen and 
the Town Clerk, by certain citizens of the Town, was 
won in Superior Court when the Court sustained the 
defendant's demurrer. An appeal from this decision to 
the Supreme Judicial Court was claimed, but to date 
has not been pursued. Suits with respect to personal 
injuries allegedly sustained as a result of a defect in a 
public way with respect to a claim of damages, for 
land taking and collection of a sewer assessment are 
still pending. Potential problems include zoning, land 
development and the Town's Wet Lands By-Law. 




IPSWICH HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Chairman 
Barbara C. Emberly 
Louise B. Hodgkins 
George R. Mathey 
Lovell Thompson 
John G. Markos 
Alice Keenan 



The Historical Commission, during the past year, 
has been actively engaged in continuing work on the 
Historical Preservation Demonstration Project. This pro- 
ject, which has been financed equally by the Ipswich 
Heritage Trust and the U.S. Department of Housing 
and Urban Development, is now approaching comple- 
tion under the direction of Mr. John Cole. The heart 
of the project has been the development of the legal 
procedures by which covenants may be made with 
Ipswich home-owners to preserve certain architecturally 
important features of their homes. Such covenants 
have already been signed between the Historical 
Commission, representing the Town, and the following 
home-owners: 



Harold Bowen, 3 Summer St. 

Edward R. and Barbara Emberley, 6 Water St. 

Ian and Jean Forman, 97-99 High St. 

John E. and Anne B. Greenlaw, 62 East St. 

Robert M. and Pattie T. Hall, 7 County St. 

George E. and Louise C. Hodgkins, 80 East St. 

Niels and Eileen Knakkergaard, 57 North Main St. 

George R. and Sheila W. Mathey, 1 Turkey Shore Rd. 

Paul J. and Cathleen C. McGinley, 26 High St. 

James C. McManaway, Jr., 64 North Main St. 

Ivan A. and Mary F. Nichols, 33 High St. 

Theodora Perry, 2 Turkey Shore Rd. 

Joseph and Vera Ross, 104 High St. 

Lovell Thompson, Argilla Rd. 

We believe that these citizens are to be greatly 
commended for their willingness to accept new obliga- 
tions in order to demonstrate a workable method of 
preserving some of the most important features of our 
historical homes. The full report on this significant 
project will be published in the spring. 

The Commission has continued its project of 
supplying plaques for more of the earliest homes 
where the research has provided the approximate dates 
of the original structures. 



21 



The Commission cooperated with the Chamber of 
Commerce in its celebration of Old Ipswich Days in' 
August. Mrs. Alice Keenan furnished the historical 
information for an interesting brochure which high- 
lighted a walking tour of the historic houses of the 
town. The Commission, also under the direction of 
Mrs. Keenan, arranged an exhibition of old pictures, 
ancient records, and early fire equipment in the Heard 
house which had been cleaned up for the occasion 
through the assistance of the Town Manager's office. 

Early in the year, the Commission received permis- 
sion of the Board of Selectmen to undertake, in con- 
junction with the Town Clerk, various measures which 
would contribute to the safety and preservation of the 
Town's early records. A small number of these docu- 
ments were removed to the Public Library and under 
the supervision of the Archives Committee they have 
been catalogued, microfilmed and filed in locked steel 
cabinets, with extra microfilm copies furnished to the 
Town Clerk. 



In October, the Commission undertook the responsi- 
bility for transporting under police guard the Town's 
records dating from 1633 to 1850 to the Probate 
Court Building in Salem where they were microfilmed 
by the Genealogical Society of the Church of the 
Latter Day Saints of Jesus Christ. Copies of these 
microfilms are to be supplied to the Town without 
cost. 

As the year drew to a close, the Commission joined 
with members of the Friends of the Library, the 
Library Staff, the Historical Society and the Coterie, 
and Mr. Ronald Tolios of the High School faculty to 
develop a project on the oral history of Ipswich to be 
called "Ipswich Speaks". 

The Commission acknowledges with appreciation the 
assistance and cooperation of the Town Manager, many 
Town officials and citizens in the carrying out of its 
various projects. 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Annette I. George, Director 

Brother W. Robert Russell, Chairman 

David L. Baldwin 

Sally Coates 

Robert A. LaBrie, Jr. 

Cathleen McGinley 

George W. Pacheco 

Mary Graffum 




1971 has been a full and successful year for the 
Ipswich Youth Commission. Among the activities we 
have been responsible for are the following: 

322 evenings at the Drop-in-Cenler 

10 week seminar on Drug Education and Information 

for Parents and Teens 
26 movies (four outdoors during the summer) 
Counseling for disturbed young people 
10 weeks of Arts and Crafts 
Four ecology films and initial support of a Solid 

Waste Recycling effort 

2 Cook-outs at Crane's Beach 

3 Rock Concerts at Castle Hill 
5 Dances 

Support of Summer hockey and lacrosse programs 



The Drop-in-Center continues to be well attended 
by the High School Age young people. 300-400 young 
people per week attend this facility. The average 
attendance at Dances and/or Concerts is about 350. 

The Director for the Youth Commission and one 
Commission member attended a three day seminar on 
Drug Abuse at North Shore Community College. The 
Director also attended a three day workshop on 
Community Organization for members of the Depart- 
ment of Youth Services Staff. Contact has been estab- 
lished, through the Director, with many other 
communities throughout the Commonwealth. 

A sub-committee on Counseling has been 
established. Dr. Edward B. Marsh, Rev. Merle R. 



22 




YOUTH COMMISSION - Sally Coates, Nan George, Director, Joanne Jenkins, Clerk, Cathleen McGinley. Bros. Robert 
Russell, Chairman, Robert LaBrie, Michael Griffin, George Pacheco, David Baldwin. 



Pimental, and Rev. Frederick J. Spulnik serve on this 
committee. The Juvenile Probation Officer, A. Gerard 
Beauchamp, is also working with the Youth Commis- 
sion on Counseling. 

The Pupil Personnel Service Committee of The 
Ipswich Public School System works cooperatively on 
mutual problems. The Director for the Youth 
Commission and Mrs. Mary Lou Sherr, Open Campus 
Coordinator, are presently developing a Service Corps 
to coordinate young people and jobs in the community. 




"A leisurely afternoon at the Drop-In-Center" 



The Ipswich Police Department has been most help- 
ful with suggestions and advice. The cooperation 
received from this mutual sharing of ideas has been of 
definite help to the young people in the Town. 

The Department of Youth Services of the Common- 
wealth has been always available and helpful with 
time, ideas and most important, a sizeable grant of 
money to the Youth Commission in order to carry 
out many of the aforementioned projects. 

The Ipswich Youth Commission depends largely on 
contributions from the community in order to carry 
on its work. The volunteers who give so freely of 
their time to help our young people succeed on a 
positive path are the most important part of our pro- 
gram. Special thanks must be extended to the many 
Brothers from La Salette Seminary who give more 
than we can measure. During 1971 contributions of 
time, money and goods were leceived from the people 
of Ipswich in gratifying degrees. 

The Youth Commission looks forward to 1972 with 
pleasure. We hope to expand some areas of our pro- 
grams and continue our successes. 





"Farewell to Welfare -/l-rj Edith 
Ciavola, Stella Zervas, Conine Lev- 
esque, and Eunice Ellis have been 
relocated to offices in Essex and 
Salem after years of occupying 
the offices on the second floor in 
the Town Hall." 



23 



''Chief Arm a nd 
Brou Matte is the first 
to make a donation 
toward the Little Lea- 
gue Candy Sale. " 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand Brouillette, Chief 

The Police Department has had a very busy year. 
Beside doing the many tasks that have to be done, we 
are now burdened by having to transport our prisoners 
to-and-from Danvers. This ties up one third of the 
patrol cars and two thirds of the patrol force. These 
trips average one hour duration thereby leaving the 
town protected by a slim blue line. 

One man was added to the force last year which 
enabled us to promote Ptl. Klimas/.ewski to Inspector. 
Up to now this has proven to have been a good 
decision. More cases are resolved by arrests and more 
financial remuneration for loss incured to victims of 
crime has occured. 

Other changes have occured such as the new 
uniforms, the new computerized teletype system 
installed and in operation with eight qualified opera- 
tors, the four clerks who do a commendable job of 
answering phone and radio calls and dispatching cars, 
the newly remodeled police quarters done entirely by 
members of the department. 

Our most important asset is the personnel in the 
department. We are fortunate to have with us a gradu- 
ate of Northeastern University with a B.S. in Police 
Science in the person of Peter Foote, also, a new 
recruit Ptl. Charles Surpitski with a Master's in 
Government from Fordham University, Ptl. Richard 
Burns who very ably fills the vacancy created by 
promoting Ptl. Klimaszewski to Inspector. Beside the 
above, the department has four members currently 
enrolled in college to broaden their education in Police 
Science to better serve the town. 



The department has indeed been busy which can be 
seen by the statistical table below: 



C'ouil Cases 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Injured in M/V Accidents 

Fatalities 

Complaints Received 



The above reflects only part of our duties, we also 
check vacant homes and the business establishments 
every night. This year 567 were found insecure. 



1970 


1971 


725 


985 


495 


566 


134 


140 


5 


1 


5337 


7957 




"Larry Jordan, one of three Police Cadets hired in 1971, 
operates the 1971 installed teletype - a facility that will 
enable the Ipswich Police to communicate with nation-wide 

departments. " 



24 



As the years go by we see an increase in the 
population as more homes and apartments are being 
constructed. We are no longer a rural department that 
answers only minor complaints of neighborly bickering, 
but rather a growing suburban community with a 
cross-section of middle-class people and with it the 
problems of urban culture with it's housebreaks, crimes 
against the person and the inevitable drug scene. These 
problems take a concerted effort from a well staffed 
and equipped police department. 

The department is working toward three car cover- 
age of the Town during daylight and high problem 
times. We anticipate that this will require an additional 
two patrolmen and increased annual vehicular equip- 
ment replacement. 

Our staff include: 

Chief Armand R. Brouillette - 
^Sgt. Boley Radzinski* 

Sgt. Frank Geist^ 

Sgt. Joseph Carpenters 

Insp. Walter Klimaszewskic 

Ptl. Edward Rauschert 

Ptl. Arthur SolomonidesT 

Ptl. Peter Footes 
"■» Ptl. Nicholas Fiory^ 

Ptl. Richard Lombard 1 " 

Ptl. Edward Walsh. . 

Ptl. John Poirier t a 
-Ptl. Paul Griffin i» 
—Ptl. George Stevenson 'i 

Ptl. Richard Burns •£ 

Ptl. Charles Surpitskhfc 

Part-time secretary and record keeper: 
Mrs. Joyce Gysan 

Clerk dispatchers: 

Mrs. Loretta Hancock 
Mr. John Cook 
Mr. Larry Jordan 
Mr. Charles Schwartz 




"Police Officers Walt Klimaszewski, Arthur Solomonides and 
Paul Griffum remove an ancient jail cell door during the 
renovation of the Town's condemned jail. A project that 
was completed through the donations of time from off- 
duty men, and individual contributions of people and ven- 
dors in Ipswich. " A JOB WELL DONE!!!! 



"Chief Scahill and three 
of his men make inspec- 
tions during Fire Preven- 
tion Week. " 




25 




FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Russell Scahill, Chief 



The department made a total of 372 runs for the 
year. Of these 307 were still alarms and 66 were bell 
alarms. This is just about the same as in 1970 with 
the ban on outdoor burning still playing a big part in 
keeping down the number of grass and woods fires. 

The vehicles covered approximately 15,000 miles for 
the year. A total of 2800 feet of Vh inch hose was 
used, 7700 feet of 2 x /i inch hose was used and 3400 
feet of one and one eighth hose was used during the 
year. A total of 49,815 gallons of water from the 
booster tanks was used compared to 173,895 gallons 
in 1970. A total of 210 feet of ladders were raised 
during the year. 



A total of $42,967.02 was paid out for fire losses 
on buildings valued at $201,648.00 and on estimated 
losses of $42,949.67. These figures are in comparison 
to $21,113.08 paid out on buildings valued at 
$106,770.00 and on estimated losses of $25,000.00 in 
1970. 

The fire alarm extension on Argilla Road was com- 
pleted this year with the installation of a new fire 
alarm box at the corner of Heartbreak Road and 
Argilla Road. 

I would like at this time to remind the towns- 
people of the dire need of a new ladder truck which 
was turned down last year. Also the townspeople again 
should be giving serious consideration to the building 
of a new fire station in outer Linebrook as it is 
getting to be a very serious situation for us to cover 
the whole town with only one central station. 

As new apartments are constructed, the department 
will be considering upgrading the present alarm system. 

The following is a report of some of the other 
duties of the Fire Department. 



Blasting permits 

Oil burner inspections 

Complaints investigated 

False alarms 

Bomb Scares 



"Fire Department in action during a house fire caused by 
lightning. " 



1970 


1971 


4 


12 


45 


87 


150 


135 


7 


17 


5 


5 





"Firemen respond to a call on Poplar 
Street. " 




CIVIL DEFENSE 



John R. Harrigan 



The Civil Defense organization of Ipswich just com- 
pleted a very active year with participation by Aux- 
iliary Police, Communication (Races) and Auxiliary 
Fire Dept. 

The Auxiliary Fire Dept. are on a program of re- 
vamping and updating of their equipment which now 
consist of a Fire Pumper Engine, a tank wagon and a 
new tank wagon being added soon. These are especial- 
ly useful in fighting woods fires or fires in areas be- 
yond town water. The Auxiliary Fire Dept. was ex- 
panded from 6 men to 30 men. Which naturally 
necessitate a training program well under way. Directed 
by Capt. Ed. Francis. 

Using the latest communication, reporting and dis- 
semination techniques. The communication group hope 
to establish an E.O.C. (Emergency operation center) 
which will be the Life blood of the community during 
civil or natural disasters. Communications are provided 
by two Civil Defense channels — using both fixed and 
mobil stations — walkie talkies equipment and radio 
telephone patching equipment. This group of volunteers 
have the necessary equipment to do a good job with 
communications. 



When an emergency situation warrants the CD. Di- 
rector and Key advisors move into the command 
center to take charge of operations and the Civil De- 
fense staff is augmented by representatives of govern- 
mental and private agency who help meet the emer- 
gency. 

The following is an outline report on the activities 
of the Ipswich Auxiliary Police for the year 1971: 



I. Monthly Meetings (bi-weekly) 

a) Usual business transactions 

b) Special transactions: 



by 



At- 



1. Introductory lecture and instruction 
Chief-of-Police A. Brouillette 

2. Law instruction lecture delivered by 
torney Paul Gillespie. 

3. Instruction lecture on warrants, summons, 
and subpoenas delivered by Clerk-of-Courts 
G. Hayes 

4. Instruction of the use of the Breath-o- 
Lizer by Liaison Officer E. Rauscher 

II. Continuation of Cruiser Patrol (June, July, and 
August) 

a) Carried out every Wednesday, Thursday, Fri- 
day, and Saturday evenings from 7 to 11 p.m. 
for 13 weeks 

b) This represents 32 man hours per week, with 
a total of 416 man hours for the duration 

III. Halloween Patrol 

a) Entailed 20 men for 4 hours on Halloween 
evening 

b) Total of 80 man hours 

IV. Memorial Day Parade 

a) Entailed 15 men marching and 

b) 3 men on traffic duty 

V. Call-out (Feb. 26) 

a) Search and Rescue Call (555) for lost 15 year 
old boy on the evening of Feb. 26, 1971 

b) 10 men responded. Total man hours = 20 



27 






SHELLFISH-HARBORS 

Arthur Moon 
Harbor Master 
Shellfish Constable 



Once again the rivers offered thousands of boaters 
many enjoyable hours of boating and fishing. 

Channel markers were put in most of the rivers 
that needed them. Five mile an hour signs were put 
up in five areas. The Town floats were put out. They 
were in poor shape and will be rebuilt this coming 
year. The new catwalks to the floats were built in the 
spring. 

The river is in very poor shape. It is almost impass- 
able at low tide. 

All water was patrolled day and night with assist- 
ance by the police boat on Sundays and Holidays. 63 
boats were stopped for minor violations. One man was 
taken to court for possession of a stolen boat. 

1970 

Town Boat was called out 41 

Boats reported lost or missing 63 

Boats found 61 

Outboards stolen 2 

Outboards found 

Boating accidents 1 

Drownings (Hood's Pond) 1 

(Off Crane's Beach) 



1971 
31 

43 

42 

3 

1 
9 



The records for 1971 show we had a good year for 
shellfish. We had a beneficial seeding in the spring and 
fall which means the digging should be profitable in 
1972. Sea clamming was excellent in most areas. A lot 
of school children made good money digging clams. A 
dragger was hired to drag mussels in the Castle Neck 
River; we cleaned off about 2,100 bushels according 
to the report of the skipper. One boy was hired for 
five months to rake alge and mussels. About 1 1 
bushels of clams were confiscated, mostly small clams 
or people digging without a permit. 

The Jr. High School had several classes out on dif- 
ferent trips; they were studying shellfish and animal 
life on the bottom of the ocean. The Town boat took 
the children out. 

Four clam areas were closed from April 1 until 
December 5 for winter digging. One man was taken to 
court for digging without a permit. 

PERMITS ISSUED WERE: 



1970 

121 Commercial 

673 Resident Noncommercial 

215 Nonresident Yearly 
523 Nonresident Daily 

1971 

130 Commercial 

817 Resident Noncommercial 

216 Nonresident Yearly 
418 Nonresident Daily 



$20.00/year 

2.50/year 

15.00/year 

2.50/ day 



S20.00/year 

2.50/year 

1 5 .00/year 

2.50/ day 



The Shellfish Advisory Board was very active in 
meetings and in field work. 



VETERANS SERVICES 

Frank Story, Director 

The number of veterans and their dependents re- 
ceiving assistance in the Town of Ipswich under 
Chapter 115 of the General Laws, as amended, is 
being reported by the number of cases processed 
monthly as follows: January - 80, February - 80, 
March - 72, April - 69, May - 69, June - 67, July - 
69, August - 65, September - 68, October - 71, No- 
vember - 78, December - 80. A total of 868 cases 
were processed this year. 38 applications for the Mas- 
sachusetts Vietnam Bonus were filed. Exclusive of the 
bonus, 50% of the cost of the Benefit program is 
reimbursed by the State. Expenditures are listed in the 
financial statement of the Town Report. 

Veterans' Services - Federal 

It is the primary function of this department to 
secure all Federal funds for veterans and their depend- 
ents to which they have entitlement. Services rendered 
to veterans and their dependents are as follows: 25 
Applications for Replacement of Separation Documents, 
26 Applications for Education, 58 Power of Attorney 
forms, 21 Applications for Hospital Treatment, 9 Ap- 



plications for Real Estate Abatements, 3 Treasury 
Checks returned, 4 Headstone Applications, 28 Applica- 
tions for Pensions & Compensations, 26 Statements in 
Support of Claim, 13 Statements of Income & Net 
Worth, 14 Applications for Outpatient Treatment, 51 
Annual Questionnaire Cards, 24 Change of Address 
forms, 13 Certificates of Eligibility, 1 Declaration of 
Marital Status, 1 Statement of Dependency, 7 Claims 
for Insurance or Indemnity, 3 Requests and Consent 
to Release Information, 1 DA application for Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, 5 Requests for Change of School 
or Program, 1 Statement of Disappearance, 3 Requests 
for School Attendance, 1 Application for Commissary 
Card, 4 Headstone Applications, 1 Application for 
Cash Surrender Value, 1 Application for Housebound 
Examination, 1 Application for Review of Discharge, 1 
Flag Application, 1 Selection of Optional Settlement, 
15 Requests for Copy of War Records. 

Compensations and Pensions obtained through this 
office for Ipswich veterans and their dependents 
totaled $196,836.00 yearly. Hospitalizations in VA 
facilities saved the Town of Ipswich $65,300.00. Edu- 
cational benefits being received by veterans and their 
dependents total $83,430.00. These three categories 
account for a total of $345,566.00 in savings to the 
Town of Ipswich. 



28 



HEALTH 




The dog officer, John Wegzyn, reports that there 
were 84 dog bites in Ipswich in 1971, the owners 
were notified to confine the dogs for 10 days. 

There were 105 burial permits issued in 1971 and 
8 removal permits. 

Permits and licenses were issued for: milk, oleo, 
pasteurizing, collection of fat and bones, ice cream 
manufacturing, restaurant permits, motels, camps, in- 
dividual sewerage systems, cleaning of cesspools and 
septic tanks, methyl alcohol etc. 

There were 5 premature babies born to Ipswich 
residents in 1971. 



Roland Foucher, Agent 

Dr. William C. Wigglesworth, Chairman 

Norman L. Quint 

Joseph Adamowicz D.M.D. 

Clinics held through the year: 
Well Child Clinic: 

This clinic is held at the Winthrop School on the 
first Monday of each month at 3:00 P.M. All pre- 
school children are immunized against polio, DPT., 
measles, rubella etc., at no charge. 
Rabies Clinic: 

This clinic was held at the Town garage on May 
23, 1971 and Dr. Cornelius Thibeault immunized 
389 dogs against rabies. The Board of Health 
turned in to the Town Treasurer $401.50. 

Dr. Joseph Adamowicz was appointed to the Board 
of Health by the Town Manager. 

The water is now being fluoridated by one part per 
million. 

There were 168 plumbing permits issued in 1971 
and 104 gas permits. 

An animal inventory and inspection was made by 
the animal inspector John Wegzyn. 




Roland Foucher and Public Works Director, Kevin D. 
McElhinney, check fluoridation equipment. " 




PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Kevin D. McElhinney, Director 



A year of great activity aptly describes 1971 in 
reference to the Public Works Department. Projects 
varied from fluoridation of water supplies to mosquito 
spraying. Both manpower and equipment were shifted 
to better implement the Public Works concept within 
the operation of each division. 

New employees were added to various divisions. The 
Highway employed Mr. Elden Caputi as clerk; Mr. Earl 
Richards was added to the Water division in the 
capacity of meter reader; and Steven McKay was 
added to the Equipment Maintenance division in the 
newly-created position of assistant mechanic. 

A brief description of the individual division's oper- 
ations during the year is offered below: 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Removal of the Welfare Department operations from 
Ipswich allowed us to expand and renovate the offices 



29 



of the Police Department and Accounting Department. 
The Accounting Department was moved to the vacated 
Welfare offices and the old Accounting office was 
renovated for expansion of the Police Department. We 
are at present examining methods of further renovation 
of the Police Department, whereby new cells will be 
installed adjacent to the Police offices. 

There were no major capital improvements made at 
the Memorial Building. Normal maintenance and repairs 
were carried out by Parks Department personnel. 

The Library Building was enhanced by the repair of 
the decorative iron fence along its frontage on North 
Main Street. Other capital improvements included 
painting inside and outside, and additional lighting in 
the Children's Room. 

Capital outlays for the Fire Department building in- 
cluded an overhead door replacement and the installa- 
tion of a new floor in the dormitory area. 

During the spring of 1971, vandalism caused much 
damage to the "Lighthouse" building at Crane's Beach. 
Through insurance payment and Town appropriation, 
the house was brought back into good repair and was 
available for rental during the summer season. Parks 
Department personnel assisted in maintenance and re- 
pair of the building. 



"Jiustino employees work with a laser beam during the 
water and sewer construction work on Turkey Shore Road 
and vicinity. " 




EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Town Meeting monies were appropriated whereby all 
Town vehicles would be serviced at the Highway Gar- 
age. An Assistant Mechanic was added to help with 
the increased work load encumbered by this operation. 
A system has been set up whereby all vehicles are 
properly serviced on a scheduled basis. Each vehicle 
has been inventoried and all repairs are logged so that 
an accurate cost of operation per vehicle can be ascer- 
tained to aid department heads in assessing their 
vehicle replacement schedules. 

SEWER DIVISION 

An article for the appropriation of funds to build- 
ing a Secondary Sewage Treatment Plant was passed at 
Town Meeting. Currently the Town's consulting engi- 
neers, Metcalf & Eddy, are busy preparing plans and 
specifications for the construction of same and we are 
hopeful that bids will be taken and awarded during 
the summer of this year with completion scheduled 
for 1974. 

With the approval of the Sewage Treatment Plant 
by the Town Meeting, the State Department of Public 
Health removed a ban on further sewer extensions, al- 
lowing us to move on with our sewerage program. C. 
Jiustino Inc. extended the Town sewerage system on 
Poplar Street, Payne Street, Wood's Lane, Turkey 
Shore Road, and Labor-in-Vain Road. The Housing 
Authority extended the sewer main on Caroline Ave- 
nue, and the sewer was put in on Hodgkins Drive, 
Heard Drive, and Dudley Way under the Subdivision 
Control Laws. 

Division personnel were responsible for sewage treat- 
ment as well as maintenance of our sewerage system. 
Records were kept and departmental statistics are as 
follows: 

1970 1971 

Sewage treatment/ 

daily average: 430,016 gals. 476,846 gals. 

Total Sewage Treated: 156,956,000 gals. 174,249,000 gals. 

New Connections: 86 81 

Total Connections: 823 

Chlorine Used : 9.675 tons 13.8 tons 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Maintenance of highways and drains is the chief re- 
sponsibility of the Highway Division. In addition, the 
Highway personnel assisted the Water division on main 
installations at various locations throughout the Town. 

During the year, the division personnel accomplished 
the following: Chapter 90 Construction continued on 
Linebrook Road, from Bull Brook to the peak of the 
hill near Marini's stand. This was completed by Town 
forces with the assistance of Drinkwater Construction 
Company. Plover Hill Road was rebuilt and a new 
wearing surface was applied. 

An asphalt overlay was applied on the following 
streets: Washington Street, Heartbreak Road, Old 
England Road, Poplar Street, Wood's Lane, Turkey 
Shore Road, Loney's Lane, Mitchell Road, Elm Street, 
Saltonstall Street, Union Street, Warner Road. 



30 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
For the Town of 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Year Ending December 31, 1971 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 



BALANCE SHEET— DECEMBER 31, 1971 



ASSETS 



CASH 




General 


449,906.43 


Petty: 




Accounting 


5.00 


School 


25.00 


Electric 


375.00 


Certificate of Deposit 




Revenue 


500,000.00 




950,311.43 


ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 




Taxes: 





Levy of 1966 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1967 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1968 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1969 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1970 

Real Estate 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1971 

Real Estate 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1972 

Real Estate 



Motor Vehicle Excise: 



Levy of 1962 
Levy of 1964 
Levy of 1965 
Levy of 1966 
Levy of 1967 
Levy of 1968 
Levy of 1969 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 



Farm Animal Excise: 
Levy of 1971 

Tax Title and Possessions : 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 



85.80 

677.89 

267.30 

186.00 

19,973.08 
792.00 

123,520.19 
3,361.95 

(4,032.00 ) 
144,832.21 



83.90 
1,560.38 
2,944.29 
2,620.94 
3,098.02 
2,267.93 
1,912.23 
8,661.22 
29,484.35 
52,633.26 



20.00 



5,851.03 
7,557.30 
13,408.33 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Premiums on Loans 

Payroll Deductions 
Health Insurance 
O.M.E. Deductions 
Life Insurance 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Clothing Allowance 



299 64 



Guarantee Deposits 
Municipal Electric 
Contract Performance 



Overestimates: 



3,036.23 

74.20 

215.88 

1,466.44 

.77 

4,793.52 



15,463.00 
7,000.00 
22,463.00 



County Tax 1971 7,898.45 

State Recreation 1971 3,091.31 
Metropolitan Planning Council 4.93 
Mosquito Control 1971 135.23 
Ipswich River Watershed 583.07 



Tailings : 

Unclaimed Checks 

Gifts and Bequests : 

Ipswich Promotion-Chamber 
Trustees of Reservations 
Audubon-Ecology 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Brown School Fund 



Teachers Retirement Refund 

Federal Grants : 
School : 

Public Law 874 

Public Law 85-864 

Public Law 88-210 

National Defense Title V 
Historic District : 

H.U.D. 

Welfare : 

M.A. 



11,712.99 



2,543.47 



24.70 
200.00 

50.00 
320.00 
500.00 



1,094.70 



37.53 



3,991.00 

8,419.60 

12.28 

4,266.45 

911.80 



1,816.58 
19,417.71 



F-l 



TCWN OF IPSWICH 



BALANCE SHEET- -DECEMBER 31, 1971 



ASSETS 

Special Assessments ; 
Unapportioned Sewer 
Sewer Added to Taxes 

Levy of 1970 

Levy of 1971 
Committed Interest 

Levy of 1970 

Levy of 1971 



Departmental : 
Town Property 
Engineering 
Health 

Veterans Services 
Highway Machinery 
Cemetery 
Education 



Municipal Electric : 
Rates & Charges 

Water : 

Liens Added to Taxes 

Levy of 1970 

Levy of 1971 
Rates & Charges 



Sewer : 

Liens Added to Taxes; 

Levy of 1970 

Levy of 1971 
Rates 6c Charges 



Aid to Highways : 
State 
County 



Other : 

Loans Authorized: 
Sewer Construction 

3-7-66 Art. 63 
School Construction 
1-16-67 Art 6 



LIABILITIES 6c RESERVES 







State Grants: 




2,766.60 




Shellfish 


2,382.46 






Youth Commission 


3,589.20 


156.71 






5,971.66 


506.80 




County: 




122.53 




Dog License Refund 


2,221.12 


399.73 








3,952. 


37 


Revolving Funds: 








School Athletic 


286.48 


100.00 




Other Funds: 




45.00 




Sale of Cemetery Lots 


3,199.95 


172.14 




Conservation 


36,695.66 


56,738.40 






39,895.61 


778.75 








777.00 




Appropriation Balances: 




1,890.00 




Revenue : 




60,501. 


29 


General 
Electric: 


248,460.52 






Construction 


7,189.83 


106,587. 


44 


Bond Issue 


10,207.87 






Depreciation 


17,543.87 






Water: 








Dow's Brook Reservoir 


516.69 


1,079.20 




Water Mains 1969 


430.71 


2,581.84 




Water Mains 1970 


10,543.26 


38,836.91 




Water Mains 1971 


34,185.35 


42,497- 


95 


Plant & Investment 


5,350.89 
334,428.99 






Loans Authorized 6c Unissued 


3,943,500.00 


667.32 








721.45 




Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 


3,028.35 


Highway Machinery 


56.25 


4,417. 


12 


State Aid for Libraries 


2,136.00 






Driver Education 


11,500.00 






Water Polution Control 


7,140.00 


26,628.11 




Sewer 


70,858.82 


12,559.70 






91,691.07 


39,187. 


81 










Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 




Levy of 1967 


677.89 






Levy of 1968 


267.30 






Levy of 1969 


1,778.74 


343,000.00 




Levy of 1970 


12,426.70 






Levy of 1971 


38,654.571 


100,500.00 






53,805.20 



F-2 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 



BALANCE SHEET- -DECEMBER 31, 1971 



Dther: (Cont.) 

Sewer Treatment Plant 
3-1-71 Art 16 



3,500,000.00 
3,943,500.00 



Unprovided for or Overdrawn Accounts: 



E.S.E.A. Title I 
Metropolitan Air Pollution 

Control 
Overlay Deficits: 

Levy of 1966 
School Cafeteria 



4.42 
374.14 

16.50 

4,706.13 

5,101- 



19 



Overlay Surplus 



26,108.47 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

Farm Animal Excise 

Departmental 

Aid to Highways 

Tax Title 

Tax Title Possession 

Electric 

Water 

Sewer 



52,633.26 

20.00 

60,501.29 

39,187.81 

5,851.03 

7,557.30 

106,587.44 

42,497.95 

8,369.49 

323,205.57 



Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 405.00 



5.366.950.40 



Surplus Revenue : 
General 
Electric 
Water 



434,704.61 
36,956.13 
11,407.93 

483,068.67 
5.366.950.40 



F-3 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 



BALANCE SHEET- -DECEMBER 31, 1971 



Debt Accounts 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 




Serial Loans: 




Inside Debt Limit: 




Inside Debt Limit: 




General 


406,000.00 


General : 




Outside Debt Limit: 




Sewer Construction 


396,000.00 


General 


686,000.00 


Jr. High School Repairs 


10,000.00 


Municipal Electric 


312,000.00 




406,000.00 


Water 


650,000.00 








1,648,000.00 


Outside Debt Limit: 
General : 








Sewer Construction 


320,000.00 






Schools 


366,000.00 
686,000.00 






Municipal Electric 


312,000.00 






Water 


650,000.00 
1,648,000.00 




2.054.000.00 


2.054.000.00 



Deferred Revenue Accounts 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 103,337.74 

Suspended Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 1,220.40 



Apportioned Sewer 


Revenue 


Due: 


1972 




10,698.91 


1973 




10,003.60 


1974 




8,970.86 


1975 




8,123.91 


1976 




7,891.11 


1977 




7,264.06 


1978 




7,239.26 


1979 




6,884.59 


1980 




5,816.37 


1981 




5,195.68 


1982 




5,120.66 


1983 




3,790.36 


1984 




3,480.51 


1985 




2,988.02 


1986 




2,988.02 


1987 




2,566.02 


1988 




2,421.17 


1989 




1,725.07 


1990 




169.56 



103,337.74 



104.558.14 



Suspended Revenue 



1,220.40 
104.558.14 



F-4 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 



BALANCE SHEET- -DECEMBER 31, 1971 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Trust and Investment Fundsj 
Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Treasurer 371,400.65 
In Custody of Trustees 285,612.23 



In Custody of Treasurer : 
Animal Fund: 

Mrs. William G. Brown 

School Funds: 

Eunice Caldwell Cowles 

Scholarship 
Mark Newman Memorial 
Marianna F. Jones 



4,364.50 



10,390.32 
8,300.50 
2,066.65 



Library Funds: 
John C. Kimball 



727.47 



Park Funds: 

Appleton Memorial 1,505.82 
Martha I Savory Tree 773.80 
Hannah C Clarke-Shade Tree 

and Cemetery 640.72 

Dow Boulder Memorial 361.10 
Richard T Crane Jr. 

Picnic Fund 42,339.31 



Cemetery: 

Perpetual Care 
Flower 



134,359.76 
6,165.71 



Investment Funds: 

Post War Rehabilitation 3,400.73 
Stabilization 156,004.26 

371,400.65 



In Custody of Trustees : 
School Funds: 

Burley Education 

Brown School 

Manning School 

R. H. Manning School 

Feoffees of Grammar 
School 
Library Funds 

Heard 

Elizabeth L. Lathrop 

Library Building 

Miss Abby Newman 

George Spiller 

Treadwell 



657.012.88 



12,110.23 

6,467.74 

58,188.41 

27,069.42 

133,137.43 

10,721.01 

1,854.90 

13,686.35 

4,804.20 

1,812.05 

15,760.49 

285,612.23 

657.012.88 



F-5 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



Taxes : 

Real Estate: 

1969 Levy 

1970 Levy 

1971 Levy 

1972 Levy 



Personal Property: 

1967 Levy 

1968 Levy 

1969 Levy 

1970 Levy 

1971 Levy 



10,961.49 

110,115.46 

3,312,750.88 

4,032.00 

3,437,859.83 



18.75 

318.20 

1,182.00 

4,880.87 

87,602.03 

94,001.85 



Tax Title Redemption 685.13 

Farm Animal Excise: 

1967 Levy 

1968 Levy 

1969 Levy 

1970 Levy 

1971 Levy 



In Lieu of Taxes: 
State Property 
Cranes Beach 
Ipswich Housing Authority 



State General Fund Distributions: 
Valuation Basis Ch 660 
Machinery Basis 
School Aid Chapter 70 
Special Education 69 & 71 



Licenses and Permits: 
Selectmen: 

Alcoholic Beverages 

Amusements 

Dealers 

Common Victualler 

Auctioneer 

Junk 

Shellfish Permits 

Occupancy Permits 

Antique 10.00 

Town Clerk: 

Clam Permits 6,141.50 

Police: 

License to Carry Firearms 254.00 



Licenses and Permits (Cont.) 
Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 
Health & Sanitation: 

Milk Pasteurizing 

Camp-Cabin & Motel 

Cesspool Pumping 

Oleo & Milk 

Ice Cream Manufacturers 

Sewer Installers 

Restaurant 

Septic Tank Permits 

Rendering 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 

Street Openings 

Cesspool Pit Maint. 



12.00 


Fines and Forfeits 


57.00 




40.50 


Grants & Gifts: 


20.00 


Federal: 


159.80 
289.30 


Police Reimb Highway 

Safety Program 
Public Law 874 




E.S.E.A. Title I 


22,665.72 


E.S.E.A. Title II 


11,607.39 


E.S.E.A. Title II 


2,713.78 
36,986.89 


Library Ext. 
H.U.D. Historic Comm. 


:ions: 
51,607.93 


State: 


4,512.27 
568,870.21 


School Transportation 
Vocational Education 


45,238.00 


Trans . 


670,228.41 


School Construction 
School Lunch Program 




Tuition & Transportation 
Water Pollution Control 


1,949.00 


Education Deaf & Blind 


190.00 


Aid to Libraries 


100.00 


Shellfish Reimbursement 


60.00 


Youth Commission Grant- 


8.00 


in-Aid 


10.00 


Chapter 90 Construction 


2,400.00 


Veterans 


22.00 


Highway Safety Driver Ed 



3,240.00 

20.00 
40.00 

462.00 
37.50 
10.00 

170.00 
26.00 

470.00 

4.00 

1,448.00 

686.00 

290.00 
78.00 



18,126.00 
3,114.00 



County: 

Dog Account Refund 



3,025.00 

3,991.00 

13,002.00 

397.89 

3,454.02 
14,000.00 
37,869.91 



78,390.00 

8,514.00 
52,686.74 
52,481.16 
7,285.06 
3,570.00 
7,854.01 
2,136.00 
1,700.00 

11,172.41 

1,491.29 

56,777.85 

11,500.00 

295,558.52 



2,221.12 



F-6 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



Grants and Gifts (Cont.) 
Other Grants: 

Chamber of Commerce 
Miscellaneous 



700.00 
10.00 



710.00 



Special Assessments: 
Sewer Added to Taxes: 

1969 Levy 91.67 

1970 Levy 831.38 

1971 Levy 11,181.17 
Apportioned Paid in Advance l0,388.63 

22,492.85 



Motor Vehicle Excise: 

1963 Levy 

1964 Levy 

1965 Levy 

1966 Levy 

1967 Levy 

1968 Levy 

1969 Levy 

1970 Levy 

1971 Levy 



3.83 

8.26 

110.70 

531.49 

1,893.75 

3,082.16 

1,629.89 

53,410.30 

238,922.23 

299,592.61 



Departmental: 

General Government: 
Selectmen 
Accountant": 

Payroll Processing Reimb 
Casualty Insurance 9 
Workman's Compensation 6 



County Retirement 
Group Insurance 

Treasurer: 
Costs-Taxes 
Costs-Motor Vehicle 
Tax Certificates 
Debt Reimbursement 

Town Clerk: 
Recordings 
Marriage Intentions 
Certified Copies 
All Other 

Planning Board: 

Outside Inspection 
Other 

Appeals Board 

Town Property Rentals 



Public Safety: 
Police: 

Photo Copies 



32 
3 



Exc 



1 

1 
20 



104.33 

327.60 
,132.84 
,403.39 
,666.16 
,453.53 

702.00 
,958.00 
,074.00 
,000.00 

,925.50 
266.00 
352.50 
246.90 

540.00 

4.00 

228.00 

,087.91 

86,472.66 



89.25 



Public Safety: 

Police: 

Bicycle Registrations 
Firearm Identification 
Application-Sale-Firearms 
Accident Report 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 



55.50 
168.00 
120.00 
280.75 
258.40 



971.90 



Health and Sanitation: 
Rabies Clinic 
Sewer Connection Fees 
Sewer Rental Fees 
Sewer Rental Liens 

1970 

1971 



Highways : 
General 
Highway Machinery 



Schools : 
Tuition 

Drivers Education 
Adult Education 
Lost Books 

Feoffees Grammar Schools 
Miscellaneous 
School Lunch 
Athletic Receipts 



Recreation: 

Swimming Instruction 
Beach Stickers 
Lighthouse Rental 



Public Service Enterprises: 



401.50 

1,120.00 

17,971.80 

1,661.92 
983.60 
22,138.82 



5.00 
68.75 



73.75 



5,390.00 

700.00 

375.00 

20.75 

7,500.00 

493.93 

123,400.17 

7,107.35 

144,987.20 



402.00 
2,111.00 
265.00 
2,778.00 



Electric Light 
Rates & Services 
Construction 
Water 

Rates & Services 
Liens 
1969 
1970 
1971 



Cemeteries: 
Sale of Lots 



1,077,129.58 
7,277.00 

199,567.80 

89.15 
1,866.36 
9,572.27 
1,295,502.16 



1,980.00 



F-7 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



Cemeteries: (Cont.) 
Care of Lots 

Annual 
Openings 
Foundations 
Tents 
Liners 
Miscellaneous 



675.50 
7,075.00 
1,365.80 

870.00 

1,060.00 

45.00 



Transfer from Cemetery Trust Funds: 
Perpetual Care 6,700.00 

Flower Fund 270.00 

Hannah Clark 30.00 



Interest: 

General Revenue 
Taxes 

Tax Titles Redeemed 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Investments 
Sewer 
Other 



20,071.30 



8,530.18 
101.89 
3,035.90 
9,552.77 
7,536.75 
23.94 



Agency Trust and Investments: 
Agency: 

Payroll Deductions: 
Federal Withholding 
State Withholding 
Health Insurance 
Life Insurance 
Retirement 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Clothing Allowance 
Trust: 

Perpetual Care Bequest 

Flower Fund Bequest 

Eunice C. Cowles Scholar- 
ship Reimb. 

Manning Fund Reimb. 

R. T. Crane-Picnic Reimb 
Investments: 

Revenue Cash 

Non-Revenue Cash 

Conservation Fund 

Stabilization Fund 



331,144.48 
80,005.99 
45,575.99 

1,816.69 
50,185.65 
16,290.07 

1,750.02 

2,985.00 
250.00 

600.00 
1,824.60 
5,206.64 



1,100,000.00 

200,000.00 

1,806.72 

7,840.30 



Electric Department: 






1,854,406. 


72 


Meter Deposit 


1,150.84 


Refunds: 






Depreciation 


1,070.72 


General Government: 






Trust Funds: 




Town Manager 


20.66 




Post War Rehabilitation 


173.55 


Debt Service 


16,521.00 




John C. Kimball 


36.53 


Surety Bonds 


29.00 




Mrs. Wm. G. Brown 


219.33 


Package Insurance 


5,593.90 




Marianna T. Jones 


105.45 


Health Insurance 


230.41 




Richard T. Crane 


132.98 


Workman's Compensation 


8,981.00 




Eunice C. Cowles 


566.36 


Sewer Betterment 


739.82 




Mark Newman Memorial 


423.62 


Town Clerk 


3.00 




Martha I. Savory 


43.12 


Public Safety: 






Dow Boulder Memorial 


18.43 


Fire 


2.69 




Appleton Memorial Fountain 84.76 


Civil Defense 


120.54 




Hannah C. Clark 


40.16 


Health 


100.00 




Cemetery Perpetual Care 


6,820.70 


Public Works 






Flower Fund 


315.06 


Memorial Building 


2.11 






39,983.04 


Highway 

Equipment Maintenance 


600.00 
25.00 




Municipal Indebtedness: 




Veterans 


237.00 




Anticipation of Revenue Loans 


Schools 


9,101.34 




2, 


000,000.00 


Library 


256.00 




Serial Loans 




Electric 


12,886.73 




Water Bonds 


135,000.00 
248.40 


Water 


252.10 




Premium on Loans 


55,702. 


30 




2,135,248.40 


Veterans Recovery 


4,627. 


20 


Agency Trust and Investments 


i ' 


Damage Reimbursement: 






Agency: 




Lighthouse 


2,133.60 




Dog Fund Collections 


2,784.30 


Other 


938.22 




Electric Meter Deposits 


3,982.00 


Police Car 


234.00 




Tailings 


358.27 




3,305. 


82 






Total Receipts 


10 r 586.005. 


69 



F-8 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



Departmental Expenditures 

Public Service Enterprises: 
Electric: 



4,744,970.45 



Operation 


891,764.69 


Construction 


134,183.85 


Depreciation 


95,773.20 




1,121,721.74 


Water: 




Operation 


133,029.21 


Construction 


131,225.69 


Plant & Investment 


30,406.61 



294,661.51 



393,000.00 
114,000.00 
109,463.25 



Municipal Indebtedness: 
Maturing Debt: 
General 

Public Service Enterprise 
Interest on Maturing Debt 
Loans Anticipation-Revenue 2,000,000.00 
Interest-Anticipation Loans 2 3,287.36 

2,639,750.61 



State & County Requirements: 
State Parks 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Metropolitan Area Planning 

Council 
Shellfish Purification 
State Assessment System 
Mosquito Control Project 
Ipswich River Watershed 
County Tax 
Metropolitan Air Pollution 



Agency: 

Deposits for Services 

Dog Licenses Coll. for County 

Tailings 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

County Retirement 

Group Insurance 

O.M.E. Deductions 

Life Insurance 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Clothing Allowance Deductions 

Teachers Retirement Refunds 

560,171.20 



Trust Funds: 
Cemetery: 

Perpetual Care Bequests 2,665.00 

Flower Fund Bequests 250.00 

Perpetual Care Income 6,820.70 

Flower Fund Income 315.06 





10, 


,050.76 


Other Trust Funds: 






Eunice C. Cowles 


1 


,166.36 


Richard T. Crane 


5 


,339.62 


Hannah C. Clarke 




40.16 


Martha I. Savory 




43.12 


Mark Newman 




423.62 


Mrs. WM. G. Brown 




219.33 


Appleton Memorial 




84.76 


Dow Boulder Memorial 




18.43 


John C. Kimball 




36.53 


Mar i anna T. Jones 




105.45 


Rehabilitation 




173.55 



Investment: 

Certificates of Deposit: 
Revenue 
Non-Revenue 
Stabilization Income 



7,650.93 



1,100,000.00 

100,000.00 

7,840.30 



15,026.88 






i.: 


207 


,840.30 


1,195.20 












537.50 


Refunds: 










34.05 


Cash Advance- Payrolls 








648.92 


430.00 


Taxes 






22 


,975.35 


14,425.17 


Motor Vehicle Excise 






7 


,098.80 


335.67 


Tax Title 








296.95 


97,944.91 


Electric Accounts Receivable 




603.77 


374.14 


Water Accounts Receivable 




263.32 


130,303.52 


Water Liens 

Sewer Rental Liens 

Sewer 








746.42 

216.56 

6.04 


1,991.67 


Sewer Added to Taxes 








117.64 


r 2,784.30 


Committed Interest 








227.44 


81.68 


Apportioned Sewer Pd. 


in 


Adv 


• 


71.92 


347,243.05 


Building Permits 








21.00 


89,626.74 


Septic Tank Permits 








10.00 


54,669.60 








33 


,304.13 


44,361.92 












156.00 












1,738.13 












15,782.12 












i 1,720.29 












15.70 













Total Payments 



10 f 750. 425. 15 



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F-14 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



General Government 



MODERATOR 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 
125.00 Salaries 

Administration 

To Revenue 



125.00 



100.00 

23.00 

123.00 

2.00 

125.00 



SELECTMEN 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 
9,012.00 Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Departmental 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 



9,012.00 



6,287.00 

1,040.39 
750.00 

8,077.39 
100.00 
834.61 

9,012.00 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 
960.00 Salaries 

Administration 

To Revenue 



960.00 



100.00 
743.98 
843.98 
116.02 
960.00 



RESERVE FUND 



Available: 

Appropriation 



20,000.00 



20,000.00 
20,000.00 



Transfers: 
Recreation 
Health 
Fire 

Cemetery 
Blue Cross-Var. 
Police 
Veterans 

Equipment Maintenance 
Town Clerk 
Conservation 
Library Buildings 

To Overlay Surplus 



1,154.00 

2,205.40 

1,500.00 

2,122.00 

202.00 

300.00 

9,000.00 

1,900.00 

300.00 

53.18 

40.00 

18,776.58 

1,223.42 

20,000.00 



F-15 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 



PLANNING BOARD 



Available: 

Appropriation 



11,700.00 



11,700.00 



Expenditures : 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 



393.77 
1,666.91 
2,060.68 
7,038.91 
2,600.41 
11,700.00 



COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Special Article 



11,000.00 
11,000.00 



Expenditures: 
Nash Vigier Inc 
To 1972 



1,250.00 

9,750.00 

11,000.00 



ELECTION & REGISTRATION 



Available: 
Appropriation 



7,250.00 



7,250.00 



Expenditures : 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 



3,876.09 
455.30 



4,331. 


.39 


140 


.00 


2,778, 


,61 



7,250.00 



APPEALS BOARD 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures : 
325.00 Salaries & Wages 
Administration 

To Revenue 



325.00 



107.50 
135.70 
243.20 
81.80 
32 5.00 



TOWN MANAGER 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 
Balance 
Special Article 



47,013.00 

8.90 

24,996.71 

32,040.00 



Expenditures : 

Salaries & Wages 

Administration 

Town Report 

Out of State 

Land Purchase Heard 

Farley Brook Easements 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 
To 1972 



104,058.61 



30,012.09 

9,674.24 

3,582.60 

123.27 

32,040.00 

3,103.00 

78,535.20 

365.00 

6,998.70 

18,159.71 

104,058.61 



F-16 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 

INSURANCE 

Available: Expenditures: 

Appropriation 64,350.00 Package Ins. 26,668.11 

Workmens Comp . 25,887.00 

Public Bonds 650.00 

Police & Fire 390.00 

53,595.11 
To Revenue 10,754.89 



Available : 

Appropriation 



64, 350.00 64,350.00 

EMPLOYEES BENEFITS 

Available: Expenditures: 

Appropriation 202,604.00 Retirement Assessment 149,506.09 

HeaUh Insurance 37,837.13 

Vets Pensions 8 ,096. 33 

195,439.55 

To Revenue 7, 164.45 

202,604.00 202.604.00 

DEBT SERVICE 

Available: Expenditures: 

Appropriation 495,278.00 Payment on Principal 393,000.00 

Interest on Principal 63,277.75 

Tax Anticipation Interest 2 3, 287 . 36 

479,565.11 

To Revenue 15,712.89 

495,278.00 495,278.00 

UNPAID BILLS 





Expendi tures : 






4,154.59 


Ipswich Motors 




41.75 




Eastern Contract 




2 38.07 




Caldwell Convalescent 


2 


,145.98 




Newburyport Manor 


1 


,623.51 




Xerox Com. 




60.00 




Jackson Ind. 




5.28 




Cable Hospital 




5.00 




Chas. Stewart Co. 




24.70 




B & M Trans Co 




4.70 




North Shore Weeklies 


4 


5.60 


4,154.59 


,154.59 



F-17 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT . ) 



ACCOUNTING 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures : 
31,238.00 Salaries & Wages 
Administration 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 



31,238.00 



23,165.49 
5,786.28 

28,951.77 
1,170.00 
1,116.23 

31 .2 38.00 



TREASURER-COLLECTOR 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



Expenditures : 
30,533.00 Salaries & Wages 
8.70 Administration 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 
To Overlay Surplus 



30,541.70 



26,786.92 

3,014.76 

29 ,801.68 

38.55 

692.77 

8.70 

30,541.70 



TAX TITLE FORECLOSURE 



Available: 

Recap Tax Rate 



Expenditures : 
5,000.00 Land Court 

James E. Coppola 

To Revenue 



5,000.00 



195.00 
3.929.11 
4,124.11 

875.89 



5 ,000 



00 



ASSESSORS 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



1,500.00 

25 ,290.00 

8.35 



26,798.35 



Expenditures : 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 



To Revenue 
To 1972 



21 


,269 


.89 


2 


,638. 


13 


23 


.908 


.02 


1 


,390 


.33 


1 


,500 


.00 



26,798.35 



TOWN CLERK 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



Expenditures : 
13,889.00 Salaries & Wages 
300.00 Administration 
Capital Outlay 
Air Conditioner 

Encumbered 

To Overlay Surplus 

To Revenue 



14,189.00 



11,081.08 
1,002 .20 

214.07 

12,297.35 

1,417.80 

300.00 

173.85 

14,189.00 



F-18 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT . ) 



LEGAL 



Avai lable : 

Appropriat ion 



Expend i cures : 
11,995.00 Salaries & Wages 
Adminis t rat ion 

To Revenue 



11,995.00 



8,400.00 

302.55 

8,702.55 

3,292.45 

11,995.00 



INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



Avai lable : 

Appropriat ion 



Expenditures 
550 .00 To Revenue 
550.00 



550.00 
550.00 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Avai lable : 
Balance 
Appropriat ion 



Expendi tures : 
41.00 Administration 
300.00 Supplies & Services 

To Revenue 
To 1972 



341.00 



24, 

144. 



00 
60 



168.60 

131.40 

41.00 

341.00 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Available : 
Balance 
Appropriat ion 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



Expendi tures : 
2.000.00 Salaries & Wages 
340.00 Administration 
53.18 Appraisals 

To Overlay Surplus 
To Cons. Fund 



2,393.18 



171.45 
221.72 



1,250 


.00 


1,643. 


.17 




,01 


750 


.00 



2,393.18 



HISTORICAL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



Available : 

Appropriation 



Expenditures : 
225.00 To Revenue 
225.00 



225.00 
225.00 



NUCLEAR ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expendi tures : 
1,200.00 Administration 

To Revenue 

1,200.00 



1 



17.50 
182.50 



1,200.00 



F-19 



Available: 

Appropriation 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 

IPSWICH YOUTH COMMISSION 

Expenditures: 
6,775.00 Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Physical Plant 

To Revenue 



6,775.00 
PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



1,128.00 
2,352.73 
2,554.87 
6,035.60 
739.40 
6,775.00 



POLICE 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



618.37 

207,873.50 

300.00 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Physical Plant 
Supplies & Services 
Capital Outlay Equipment 

Patrol Wagon 

Radio Equipment 

Revolvers 

Typewriter 

Tape Recorder 

Explosion Blanket 

File Cabinets 

Encumbered 

To Overlay Surplus 

To Revenue 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



182,296.10 
8,331.39 
2,029.67 
1,900.93 

2,768.56 

3,267.00 

400.00 

134.50 

149.88 

127.25 

100.00 

201.505.28 

85.15 

300.00 

6,901.44 



208,791.87 




208,791.87 


FIRE 


Expenditures: 




187,184.00 


Salaries & Wages 


173,601.95 


1,500.00 


Adminis tr at ion 


4,070.90 




Supplies & Services 


865.08 




Equipment 


6,508.30 




Out of State Travel 


143.00 




Capital Outlay Equipment 






Hose 


974.50 




Fire Alarm Ext. 


598.00 
186,761.73 




To Overlay Surplus 


1,500.00 




To Revenue 


422.27 


188,684.00 


188,684.00 



F-20 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT . ) 
CIVIL DEFENSE 



Available: 

Appropriation 



3,510.00 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Supplies & Services 
Equipment 

Capital Outlay Equipment 
Auziliary Fire Equipment 

To Revenue 



3.510.00 



1,000.00 
963.67 
295.29 
119.66 

1,000.00 

3,378.62 

131.38 

3,510.00 



SHELLFISH & HARBORS 



Available: 

Appropriation 



14,962.00 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Supplies & Services 
Capital Outlay 
Outboard Motor 

To Revenue 



14,962.00 



8 , 962 . 00 

604.50 

3,954.73 

472.95 
13,994.18 

967.82 
14,962.00 



HEALTH 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 
Balances 

Dump Dike 

Fluoridation Equipment 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Rubbish Collection 
Garbage Collection 
Dump Maintenance 



19,620.00 
2,205.40 

1,830.36 
3,000.00 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Supplies & Services 
Capital Outlay L & S 

Dump Dike 

Fluoridation Eqt. 

To Overlay Surplus 
To Revenue 



26,655.76 
HEALTH (CONTRACTS) 



52,000.00 
27,000.00 
30,500.00 

109,500.00 



Expenditures: 

Rubbish Collection 
Garbage Collection 
Dump Maintenance 

To Revenue 



13,552.66 

884.53 

4,683.52 

1,830.00 
3,000.00 

23,950.71 

2,205.40 

499.65 

26,655.76 



52,000.00 
27,000.00 
30,478.20 

109,478.20 
21.80 

109,500.00 



F-21 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 



VETERANS SERVICES 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 
Chapter 44 Sect. 31 Auth. 



124,500.00 

9,000.00 

23,348.06 



156,848.06 



Expenditures: 
Cash Allowances 
Medical 
Groceries 
Fuel 
Burial 



51,756.14 

98,640.79 

2,112.00 

4,172.13 

167.00 

156,848.06 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Available: 
Balance 

Land Takings 
Parking Lot Leases 



Expenditures: 
15,487.00 Salaries & Wages 
Administration 

To Revenue 



15,487.00 

PUBLIC WORKS (SPECIAL ARTICLES) 

Expenditures: 
Land Taking 
3,673.04 Marini 

275.75 To Revenue 
3,948.79 



11,473.32 

907.47 

12,380.79 

3,106.21 

15,487.00 



3,673.04 

275.75 

3,948.79 



Available: 

Appropriation 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Expenditures: 
5,540.00 Salaries & Wages 
Administration 

To Revenue 



5,540.00 



4,457.59 
895.05 

5,352.64 
187.36 

5,540.00 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Balance 

Improvements 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



Available: 

Appropriation 



TOWN HALL BUILDING 

Expenditures: 
11,814.00 Salaries & Wages 
Physical Plant 
9,000.00 Repairs 
8.35 

To Revenue 

To 1972 

20,822.35 

MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Expenditures: 
3,475.00 Physical Plant 

To Revenue 

3,475.00 



6,272.35 
5,530.82 
7,212.12 

19,015.29 

19.18 

1,787,88 

20,822.35 



2,949.67 

525.33 

3,475.00 



F-22 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 



SEWER BUILDING 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 
495.00 Physical Plant 

To Revenue 

495.00 



428.19 

66.81 

495.00 



FIRE BUILDING 



Available: 

Appropriation 



5,117.00 



5,117.00 



Expenditures: 
Physical Plant 
Capital Outlay 
Overhead Doors 
Dorm Floor 
Lockers 

To Revenue 



2,372.74 

1,356.89 
645.00 
351.46 

4,726.09 
390.91 

5,117.00 



TOWN GARAGE BUILDING 



Available: 

Appropriation 



2,650.00 



2,650.00 



Expenditures: 
Physical Plant 
To Revenue 
To 1972 



2,143.82 

6.18 

500.00 

2,650.00 



CEMETERY BUILDING 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 
610.00 Physical Plant 
To Revenue 

610.00 



423.88 
186.12 
610.00 



PARK BUILDING 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 
4,020.00 Physical Plant 

To Revenue 

4,020.00 



3,471.53 

548.47 

4,020.00 



LIGHTHOUSE-INSURANCE RECEIPT 



Available: 

Insurance Receipt 



Expenditures: 
2,133.60 Repairs 

To Revenue 

2,133.60 



2,082.22 

51.38 

2,133.60 



F-23 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 
LIBRARY BUILDING 



Available: 




Expenditures: 




Appropriation 


5,975.00 


Physical Plant 


2,033.02 


Reserve Fund Transfer 


40.00 


Capital Outlay 








Lights 


77.52 






Paint ing-Outside 


250.00 






Painting-Inside 


1,260.00 






Iron Fence 


1,289.00 






Water Line 


35.00 

4,944.54 






To Overlay Surplus 


40.00 






To Revenue 


1,030.46 




6,015.00 


6,015.00 




HIGHWAY 




Available: 




Expenditures: 




Balance 


86,132.18 


Salaries & Wages 


66,428.31 


Appropriation 


215,145.00 


Administration 


938.64 


Reserve Fund Transfer 


67.15 


Physical Plant 


30,523.00 






Supplies & Services 


30,979.98 






Equipment 


22,419.76 






Capital Outlay Equipment 








Truck 


3,984.60 






Tractor Shovel 


2,450.69 






Snow P lower 


8,420.62 






Capital Outlay L & S 








Brownville Ave. 


121.50 






Wayne Ave. 


284.15 






Lafayette Rd. 


3,315.35 






Putnam Road 


1,700.01 






Sidewalk & Curb 


141.00 






Spring St. Drain 


960.78 






High St. Drain 


330.78 






Chapter 90 Maint. 


4,409.61 






Chapter 90 Const. 1968 


111.75 






Chapter 90 Const 1969 


37.50 






Chapter 90 Const 1970 


12,640.01 






Chapter 90 Const 1971 


39,000.00 






Chapter 768-Wayne 


5,158.38 
234,356.42 






To Revenue 


10,177.63 






To 1972 


56,277.66 






Encumbered 


532.62 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



301,344.33 
EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 

Expenditures: 
43,194.00 Salaries & Wages 
1 , 908 . 35 Adminis trat ion 

Supplies & Services 
Equipment 



301,344.33 



12,917.78 

297.10 

463.11 

29,731.12 

43,409.11 



F-24 



Available: 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE (Cont . ) 

Expenditures: 
To Overlay Surplus 



Available: 

Appropriation 



45,102.35 

SNOW & ICE CONTROL 

Expenditures : 
48,000.00 Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Supplies & Services 
Equipment 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 



1,693.24 
45,102.35 



48,000.00 



14,352.16 
900.00 

18,625.59 
4,950.50 

38,828.25 
1,413.37 
7,758.38 

48,000.00 



FORESTRY 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



Available: 

Appropriation 



47,418.00 
33.40 



47,451.40 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 

Administration 

Supplies & Services 

Equipment 

Capital Outlay Equipment 

Truck 

Saw 

To Revenue 

To Overlay Surplus 



MOSQUITO ALLEVIATION 

Expenditures: 
6,000.00 Salaries & Wages 
Supplies 
Equipment 

To Revenue 



6,000.00 
RECREATION & PARKS 



28,944.32 

801.50 

5,106.98 

3,211.91 

6,800.00 

399.40 

45,264.11 

2,153.89 

33.40 

47,451.40 



1,469.75 
617.42 

3,790.41 

5,877.58 
122.42 

6,000.00 



Available: 
Balance 
Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



2,602.66 

62,934.00 

1,179.40 



Expenditures: 

Salaries 6. Wages 45,123.07 

Administration 1,579.33 

Physical Plant 1,494.37 

Supplies & Services 10,568.39 

Equipment 405.50 

Out of State Travel 165.00 
Capital Outlay Equipment 

Playground Equipment 350.30 



F-25 



Available: 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 

RECREATION & PARKS (Cont.) 

Expenditures: 

Capital Outlay L & S 
Spiral Fencing 
Neck Causeway 
Great Neck Fence 
Resurface Tennis Court 



196.90 
467.00 
992.31 
776.43 





62,118.60 


To Overlay Surplus 


1,179.40 


To Revenue 


48.04 


To 1972 


3,370.02 



66,716.06 



66,716.06 



CEMETERIES 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 







Expenditures: 




52,928 


.00 


Salaries & Wages 


39,707.02 


2,138 


.70 


Administration 


946.62 






Physical Plant 


8,534.55 






Supplies & Services 


987.56 






Equipment 


1,104.55 






Capital Outlay Equipment 








Wheel Horse Vacuum 


550.00 






Casket Placer 


119.00 






Capital Outlay L & S 








Hot Top Avenue 


2 ? 000.00 
53,949.30 






To Overlay Surplus 


917.40 






To 1972 


200.00 


55,066 


.70 


55,066.70 



EDUCATION 



Available: 

Appropriation 



2,608,617.00 



Expenditures: 
Administration 
Instruction 
Other School Services 
Oper. and Maintenance 
Fixed Charges 

Acquisition of Fixed Assets 
Programs Other Dist. 



Encumbered 
To Revenue 



2,608,617.00 



69,868.19 

1,900,355.55 

252,395.16 

258,507.27 

12,745.00 

20,457.54 

8,260.33 

2,522,589.04 

50,592.95 

35,435.01 

2,608,617.00 



OTHER SCHOOL 



Available: 
Balance 

Construction Plans 
Elementary Addition 
Elementary Construction 
Preliminary Plans H. S. 



595.15 

12,624.17 

788 . 02 

750.47 



Expenditures: 
Building Needs 
Whittier Regional 



To Revenue 
To 1972 



182.75 

24,300.00 

24,482.75 

18,222.06 

5,000.00 



F-26 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 
OTHER SCHOOL (Cont.) 



Available: 

School Building Needs 
Voc. Reg. Dist. Comm. 
Reg. School Dist:. 
Appropriation 

Whittier Voc Asses. 



5,000.00 

500.00 

3,147.00 

24,300.00 
47.704.81 

LIBRARY 



Expenditures: 



47,704.81 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 
59,235.00 Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Supplies & Services 



59,235.00 



To Revenue 



43,721.54 
976.54 
13,070.80 
57,768.88 
1,466.12 
59,235.00 



IPSWICH PROMOTION 



Available: 
Balance 

Adjusting Balance 
Appropriation 





Expenditures: 


38.59 


Crawley & Co. 


700.00 


To Revenue 


700.00 




1,438.59 





675.30 
763.29 

1,438.59 



SEWER OPERATIONS 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



35,457.00 
16.70 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Physical Plant 
Supplies & Services 
Equipment 
Capital Outlay 
Pick-up Truck 

Encumbered 

To Overlay Surplus 

To Revenue 



35,473.70 



16,886.83 

322.93 

147.77 

4,420.84 

6,162.80 

2,491.85 

30,433.02 

300.00 

16.70 

4,723.98 

35,473.70 



SEWER CONSTRUCTION 



Available: 
Balance 

Treatment Plant 
High & Lord Sq. 
Tops fie Id Road 
North Main 
Sewer Ext-Matching 
Sewer Construction 



1969 



Sewer Construction 1970 



2,463.52 
33.39 
1,128.00 
4,770.05 
7,000.00 
2 , 046 . 06 
112,752.73 



Expenditures: 
North Main 
Construction 1969 
Construction 1971 
Construction 1970 

To Revenue 
To 1972 



1,005.37 

5,478.50 

11,938.65 

102,608.08 

121,030.60 

1,228.95 

111,434.20 



F-27 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES (CONT.) 



SEWER CONSTRUCTION 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Sewer Construction 1971 
Construction 1969 Supple 



Expenditures 



100,000.00 

3,500.00 

233,693.75 

ENCUMBERED- 1969 



233,693.75 



Available: 
Balance 



Expenditures: 
3,599.80 Education 

To Revenue 

3,599.80 



93.80 
3,506.00 
3,599.80 



ENCUMBERED -1970 



Available: 
Balance 



(3,689.80) 



Expenditures: 
Planning Board 
Misc. Finance 
Conservation Coram. 
Fire 

Civil Defense 
Veterans Services 
Town Hall Building 
Sewer Plant 
Highway 
Snow & Ice Control 

To Revenue 



(3,689.80) 



4,500.00 
277.05 
56.82 
396.71 
(19.15) 
1,087.99 
557.00 
5.15 
41.65 
(10,682.21) 
(3,778.99) 
89.19 
(3,689.80) 



F-28 



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F-31 





STATEMENT OF MUNICIPAL 


INDEBTEDNESS 




DATE OF ISSUE 


GEORGE C. MOURIKAS, 
PURPOSE 


TREASURER 

DATE OF MATURITY 


BALANCE 
DEC. 31, 1971 


1955 


School Loan 


October 1, 1975 


80,000 


1955 


School Project Loan 


October 1, 1975 


1+0,000 


1956 


Electric 


December 1, 1971* 


1*0,000 


1956 


Water Bonds 


September 1, 1975 


20,000 


1958 


Sewerage Loan 


October 1, 1987 


320,000 


1959 


Electric 


June 1, 1978 


1*2,000 


1961 


Electric 


July 15, 1975 


1*0,000 


1961 


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November 1, 1976 


25,000 


1961 


Water 


November 1, 1973 


85,000 


1962 


School 


July 1, 1972 


70,000 


1962 


Sewer 


July 1, 1972 


5,000 


1963 


School Project Loan 


August 15, 1973 


8,000 


1963 


Sewer 


November 1, 1973 


I*, 000 


1961* 


Water Storage Loan 


February 15, 1971* 


15,000 


. 1961* 


Sewer 


May 15, 1975 


85,000 


1961* 


Water 


May 15, 1979 


85,000 


1961* 


School Project Loan 


August 1, 1971* 


11*8,000 


1965 


Sewer 


December 1, 1975 


1*0,000 


1966 


Sewer 


August 1, 1976 


118,000 


1967 


Remodeling 


December 1, 1972 


10,000 


1967 


School Project Loan 


December 1, 1972 


20,000 


1968 


Sewer 


August 1, 1978 


80,000 


1968 


Water 


August 1, 1978 


11*5,000 


1969 


Reservoir 


August 15, 1977 


30,000 


1969 


Sewer 


August 15, 19 7l* 


25,000 


1969 


Water 


August 15, 1981* 


85,000 



7- 



1970 
1971 



Sewer 
Water 



September 1, 1975 80,000 
July 15, 1981 135,000 
TOTAL: $ 2,125,000 



F-32 




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F-33 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 



INVESTED FUNDS AS OF JANUARY 1. 1972 ; 



Deposited in the Salem Savings Bank 

" " " Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 

" Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 
" " " Ipswich Savings Bank 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank - Paid Up Certificate 



$2,278.22 
2,019.72 
4,009.81 
3,240.52 
1.000,00 

$12,548.27 



INCOME FROM FUNDS FOR THE YEAR 1971 AS FOLLOWS ; 



Interest - Salem Savings Bank 

" Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 

11 Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 

" Ipswich Savings Bank 

Dividend - Ipswich Co-operative Bank 



116.48 

103.06 

204.64 

82.14 

$561.24 



EXPENDITURES: 



Safe Deposit Box Rent 



$5.00 



Respectfully submitted, 
BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Wilmot E. Hail, Treasurer 



JL&L 



ttftift 



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F-36 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Fund 



TRUST FUNDS — 1971 



Book Value 



Market Value 



Total 
Total 



1971 
1970 



$ 



62,373 
48,631 



Increase (Decrease)^ 13,742 



$ 91,292 
76,773 

$ 1^,519 



Lower of Cost 1971 
or Market Income 



Treadwell 


$ 23,178 


$ 42,539 


$ 21,726 


$ 1,440 


Heard 


10,058 


20,461 


8,905 


722 


Lathrop 


1,855 


1,855 


1,855 


101 


Spiller 


1,812 


1,596 


1,596 


87 


Newman 


5,067 


4,870 


4,870 


263 


Building 


19,^73 


19,04l 


19,041 


725 


Memorial Book 


675 


675 


675 


34 


Wales Endowment 


255 


255 


255 


5 



$ 58,923 

44,914 
$ 14,009 



$ 3,377 
3,317 

S 60 



Operating Statement -- 1971 



Income 



Town Appropriation 










$57,859 


Books Lost - Sold 










193 


Donations (see Note 


1) 








9,042 


Fines 










1,05^ 


Photocopy 










701 


Trust Funds 










3,377 






Library 


Town 




Expenditures 




Funds 


Funds 


Total 


Salaries & Wages 






$43 


,721 


$43,721 


Telephone 




* 38 




357 


357 


Postage 






285 


323 


Training 




382 






382 


Dues, Meetings, Travel 


57 




272 


329 


Maintenance 




325 




263 


588 


Supyjlies 




79 


1 


^69 


1,548 


Books 




2,566 


10 


,643 


13,209 


Periodicals 




120 




670 


790 


Records 




365 




106 


471 


Equipment (see Note 


2) 


2,466 




72 


2,538 


Financial service 




170 






170 


Building Expansion 


Plans 


2,012 






2,012 



Total Expenditures $ 8,580 $57,858 
Net Gain (see Note 3) 



$7?,226 



$66,438 
$ 5,788 



Note 1: Includes $8,500 bequest from Lydia Harris 

Note 2: Equipment for Children's Room from Harris bequest 

Note 3: $6,000 added to Building Fund 

D. W. Poor, Jr. 
Treasurer 



F-37 



TWSTtfS OF PtiNNONg SCHOOL FUNDS 

ft). (JvjLtiLeA A/ithwi, William H. Burinham, fa.^, (ha/vl&A <f. (joodhue, fa*, 
Donald F . Whidton and David Q. ii/illiamd, S/t. 

mnnonq school funds 

flanuojiy. 1 , 1971 

Balance, in Account frl k29 J, Op/wich Saving Bank $5?> 119*80 

Balance. JLn Account if 788k, Opdwick Savings Bank 2k, 173*75 

Balance In Account ^1995, Jpdwich C°~°p Bank 292.20 

$75,585-75 
Oncome pwm Oatejie^t and Dividends: k,500.kO 

$80,086.15 
L eAA Didbuvut ementA : 



Rental of. Safe Deposit Box. $> 5*00 
Supplied fon. Jpdwich School 

Depa/itment l82k . 80 



ASSffS ON FUNDS 

December 31, 1971 



S&WJ?TQiS AT BOOK VAW£ 

138 Skan.es$, FtMt National Bank, Boston $2998.20 

20 Shafted, Jpdwich Cooperative Bank kOOO. 00 



V 



1,829.60 
$78,256.55 



Balance In Account #7k2°3, Op^wich Savings Bank $5@ > 7^9 • 53 

Balance In Account #788k, Opdwich Savings Bank 25, 190. JO 

Balance In Account $1995> ^pdivich Cp-op Bank 2,2^6.72 

$78,256.55 



6,998.20 

$85, 25k. 75 



Repo/it Submitted by. David C» Williams, / /iea4u/ie/i 



F-38 



(:p^*p/ T ^/■TIv• , tax rTRucring tt/t^k^it 

1970 1971 

P. Town 5,021,572.95 ^,3 r ?,7n<S.79 

R. County Tax ff c Assessments 99,119.60 10^, P.'(.3 . 36 

C. State Tex & Assessments 35,P?9.92 '12,5^2.65 

D. Overlay 130,821.25 ll«l,3U7.75 

E. Gross amount to be raised 5, 287, 3 '4. 3 .72 5.6b 3, 560.55 

F. Estimated receipts 8nd 

available funds" 1,761^913.09 2, 027, 6> 4 0.24. 

C. Net amount to be raised by 

taxation on property 3,522,^30.63 3*615,920.31 

H. Total Personal Property value 1,651,209.00 1,6^9,631.00 

Total Real Estate value 61, 21+.9, 33 ; ' : . 00 62,910, kl6.00 

Total valuation 62,900, 9,7 . 00 6k, 570, Olj.7.00 

Tax Hate #56.00 $56.00 

Total Personal Pronerty tax 92,.'|67.70 92,939.33 

Total Heal ^stat* Tax 3,k°9,962.9 3 3, 5pp, 9PO.9H 

J. Total Taxes Levied on Pronerty '*, cno t ,k 30 .63 3,^1-, 920.31 

K. Items not entering into determination 
of the tax rate: 

Sewer added to taxes PI, 106.66 20,3-^3.66 

v ater Liens added to taxes 10,k06.°0 ll,^°6. C) k 

L. Totals 31, c 13. r 6 31,9 60.60 

M. Total amount to be collected 3,553,9kk.l9 3,6^7,^0.91 



F-39 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



BALANCE SHEET 



DECEMBER 31, 1971 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 



Current Assets: 




Liabilities : 




Cash: 




Bonds Payable 


420,000.00 


Surplus 


11,407.93 


Surplus : 




Operations-Encumbered 1970 


-0- 


Profit or Loss 


(27,464.30) 


Plant Investment-1971 


5,350.89 


Town Contribution 


416,505.58 


Const ruction-1971 


44,728.61 


Cafflpanelli Cont. 


46,000.00 


Dow ! s Brook Reservoir 


516.69 


APW Mass. 71-G Cont. 


179,5^.52 


Water Main Construction 


430,71 


Property Account 


896,308.27 




62,434.83 


Electric Contribution 


i9,y&& 



Accounts Receivable: 
Rates & Services 
Added to Taxes _ 

Materials & Supplies _ 
Total Current Assets 
Fixed Assets: 

Engineering 

Land 

New Well System 

Pumping Station 

Reservoirs & Standpipes 

Storage Basins 

Dist. Reservoirs 

Departmental Buildings 

Store House 

Pumps & Pumping Equip. 

Purification System 

Pipe Lines & Dist. Mains 1 

Service Pipes 

Meters 

Consumers Meters Installed 

Hydrants 

Misc. Expenditures 

Office Equipment 

Shop Equipment 

Stores Equipment 

Trans. Equip. 

Misc. Equipment 



38,828.85 

?,58? f 84 

42,418.69 

30 ,775 .88 

135,629.40 

49,257.23 

20,249.72 

129,004.72 

65,555.36 

436,627.27 

27,693.59 

135,979.62 

5,222.56 

4,722.40 

69,764.80 

7,386.80 

,309,654.29 

218,469.47 

81,179.23 
1,750.40 

40,362.63 

1,912.10 

6,830.80 

8,512.0? 

68.26 

43,317.20 

15.19^t35 



Less Reserve for Deprec. 



,678,714.87 

844.111.29 

.,834.603.58 



1,550,232.98 



Total Assets: 



l, 970 .23 2 t 98 



1.970.232.98 



F-40 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



EXPENSES; 
Operating: 
Maintenance : 

Supply Structures 

Reservoirs 

Pumping Station Supplies 

Pumping Building 

Pumping Equipment 

Inspection of Meters 

Mains 

Standpipes 

Services 

Meters 

Hydrants 
Electricity Purchased 
Purification Supplies 
and Expenses 
General Labor 



63.79 

69.99 

743.40 

2,287.16 

13,696.46 

88.33 
4,540.96 

7.15 

10,585.06 

1,455.74 

2,176.10 

9,063.12 

2,331.32 
12.074.79 

59,183.39 



SALES; 
Metered 
Flat Rate 
Sale of Supplies 
Rent from Water Meters 
Tap-in Charges 
Application Charges 
Misc. Non-Operating Income 
Total Sales 

Less Discounts 
Abatements 



201,427.01 

12,490.00 

7,499.14 

4,400.00 

615.00 

7,4oo.oo 

2 .57*J>09 
236,405.24 

15,855.57 
1.733.24 



Administrative : 

General Office Salaries 
General Office Supplies 

and Expenses 
Insurance 
Transportation 
Maintenance : 

General Structures 
Depreciation 
Pensions 

Interest on Bonds 
Misc. General Expenses 



Total Expenses: 
Profit or (Loss) 



26,538.86 

3,293.50 
2,231.88 
5,519.06 

410.60 

62,403.22 

6,648.36 

12,872.50 

?? 6 t 7 l 

120,454.69 

179,638.08 

3 ?.l78 f ? 5 
218.816.43 



218.816.43 



F-41 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



BALANCE SHEET 
DECEMBER 31, 19?1 



ASSETS 

Current Assets; 
Cash: 
Depreciation 
Construction 
Plant-Art. 10, ATM I969 
Surplus 
Special!. Deposits 

Accounts Receivable 
Working Funds 
Inventory: 

Fuel Oil 

Lubricants 

Materials & Supplies 

Total Current Assets 
Fixed Assets: 



Land & Land Rights 

Power Structures 

Fuel Holders 

Prime Movers 

Generators 

Accessory ELec Equip. 

Misc. Power Plant Equip. 

Land & Land Rights 

Land Clearing 

Trans. -Poles & Fixtures 

Trans. -Overhead Conductors 

Distrib.-Sta. Equip. 

Poles & Fixtures 

Overhead Conductors 

Underground Conduits 

Underground Conductors 

Line Trans. & Regulator 

Services 

Meters 

Meter Installations 

Street Lighting 

Outdoor Private Lighting 

General Structures 

Equipment : 

Office 

Transportation 

Shop 

Laboratory 

Communication _ 

Total Fixed Assets 3 
Less Reserve for Deprec. 1 

2 



17.5^3.87 

7,189.83 

10,207.87 

36,956.13 

1 5, 453.00, 

87,350.70 

106,541.14 

375.00 

16,211.94 

1,438.84 

33.368.42 

51,019.20 

245,286.04 



841.20 

115,366.15 

9,336.48 

,115,411.68 

35,766.78 

78,891.49 

16,379.35 
17,706.60 

4,428.00 

42,584.49 

26,691.33 
696,056.80 

272,584.37 
316,837.10 

47,303.36 

70,7.05.50 
297,008.25 

42,841.70 

115,362.06 

1,291.48 

85,460.67 
3,804.97 

69,217*00 

23,440.21 

112,312.45 

6,358.89 

3,458.88 

6,4 37.86 

, 633 f 885 .10 

,385,801,30 
,248,083.80 



LIABILITIES & SURPLUS 



Liabilities : 
Bonds Payable 
Customers* Deposits 
Interest Accrued 



Surplus: 
Loans Repayment 
Construction Contrib. 
Unappropriated Earned 
Surplus 



312,000.00 

15,453.00 

5.030t3 6 

332,483.36 



800,000.00 
10,978.06 

1. 249,908.42 
2,160,886.46 



Total Assets 



2.493, 369t94 
F-42 



Total Liab. & Sur. 



2.4 93.369t84 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



Expenses* 




Sales: 




Generating: 




Residential 


559,459.89 


Operation, Supervision 




Home Heating 


26,978.71 


and Engineering 


12,720.00 


Apartment Heating 


30,200.70 


Fuel 


221,086.50 


Commercial 


180,749.85 


Generation Expense: 




Industrial 


156.857.38 


Labor 


90,018,93 


Commercial Heating 


1,268.34 


Lubricants 


9.573.25 


Street Lighting 


21,500.00 


Maintenance : 




Municipal Buildings 


33,197.63 


Supervision & Engineering 


11,646.61 


Private Area Lighting 


2,144.75 


Structures - Power 


3.096.97 


Sales for Resale 


122,360.87 


Generator & ELec . Equip. 


10,622.83 


Misc. Service Rev. 


145.00 


Misc. Other Expenses 


4.664.27 


Other Electric Rev. 


9.772.46 




363.^29.36 


1 


,144,635.58 






Less Disc. & Abate. 


87.135.26 


Other Power Supply: 




Net Sales 1 


,057,500.32 


Purchased Power 


279,558.18 


Other Income: 




Distribution : 




Interest : 




Overhead Trans. Lines 


218. 31 


On Depreciation Fund 


926.77 


Overhead Lines Exp. 


185.00 


On Special Deposits 


1.154.72 


Underground Lines Exp. 


266.70 


Total Other Income 


2,081.49 


Meter Expenses 


10,318.80 






Maintenance: 








Supervision & Engineering 


10,000.00 






Dist. Station Equip. 


2,297.75 






Overhead Lines 


61,109.84 






Underground Lines 


1,306.37 






Street Lighting 


6,474.55 






Misc. Expenses 


?.857.?2 
102,034.64 






Customers Accounts Receivable: 






Supervision 


1,298.51 






Meter Reading 


7,495.21 






Records & Collections 


29,246,91 
38,040.63 






Administrative & General: 








Salaries 


27,031.06 






Office Supplies & Expense 


2,814.32 






Outside Services 


1,596.44 






Property Insurance: 








General 


2,067.96 






Power 


6,103.92 






Injuries & Damages: 








General 


2,541.96 






Power 


2,079.96 






Employees Pensions 


29,453.88 






Maint. General Plant 


3.991.57 






Transportation 


10.469.93 






Depreciation 


101,765.52 






Interest on Bonds 


16,303.74 






Misc. General Expense 


5,007.20 






Interest Refunds 


182.52 
211,409.98 






Total Expenses 


994,472,79 






Net Profit 


65.109.02 






1 


.,059,581,81 


1 


.059.581.81 



P-43 



An oil and sand wearing surface was put on the 
following streets: Waldingfield Road, Outer Linebrook 
Road, Randall Road, Charlotte Road, Newbury Road, 
Paradise Road, Plains Road, and Old Right Road. 

In addition, division personnel patched roads, re- 
paired sidewalks, repaired drains, cleaned catch basins, 
assisted in recycling operations, hauled cover fill to the 
dump, plowed and sanded seventy -six miles of road- 
way, and performed other routine maintenance as re- 
quired. 

During the year, the easements necessary for con- 
struction of the Farley Brook Project were taken. It is 
expected that the Division of Waterways will have 
plans and specifications ready for bid during the spring 
of 1972 with construction to follow. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The newest activity adopted by the Forestry divis- 
ion was the implementation of Mosquito Spraying. 
This operation is done nine weeks of the year and, in 
conjunction with the Essex County Mosquito Control's 
program, assures that all areas within the Town are 
sprayed once a week during the mosquito season. 

In addition, division personnel accomplished the fol- 
lowing: removed diseased elms; sprayed elms with 
dormant spray; sprayed elms twice for leaf beetles; 
sprayed oaks three times for oak leaf skeletonizer 
worms with good results; worked forty -five days for 
the Electric Department in line clearing; worked thir- 
teen days at the cemeteries, pruning and removing 
trees; worked three days for the Fire Department, 
clearing branches around fire alarm services; spent six 
days with rented stump machine removing one hun- 
dred twenty-five stumps; planted new trees; planted 
replacement trees; set up and tore down for voting 
and Town meetings; spent three days with the Parks 
Department, building a backstop; worked ten days on 
clearing and grubbing for Chapter 90 Construction; and 
assisted the Highway division in snow and ice control 
operations. 

WATER DIVISION 

In accordance with the vote of Town Meeting, the 
division personnel implemented fluoridation of our 



water supply. This required installation of propor- 
tionate feeders at all water sources. Each day, division 
employees are required to sample all supplies and test 
to insure that the optimum level of fluoride residual is 
maintained in the water supply. 

During April, May and June, the Winthrop and 
Brown's wells were chemically treated and flushed, at 
which time their pumping capacities doubled and 
returned them to their original yield capacity. 

In addition to normal maintenance, division 
personnel extended water mains in the following loca- 
tions: 



Lakeman's Lane 


3,350' - 


10" main 


Heartbreak Road 


3,640' - 


10" main 


Essex Road 


750' - 


10" main 


Kennedy Drive 


649' - 


8" main 


Heard Drive 


1,745' - 


8" main 


Hodgkins Drive 


1,652' - 


8" main 


Dudley Way 


340' - 


8" main 


Mulholland Drive 


2,200 - 


8" main 


Paradise Road 


700' - 


8" main 


Pine swamp Road 


1,900' - 


8" main 


A brief summation of 


division functions is as 


follows: 








1970 


1971 


New meters installed: 


92 


101 


Meters replaced: 


89 


97 


Services turned on: 


172 


165 


Services turned off: 


129 


148 


Services repaired: 


129 


87 


New services: 


23 


56 


Services discontinued: 


2 


1 


Hydrants installed: 


16 


12 


Hydrants removed: 


6 





New water mains installed: 


7,516' 


16,926' 


Total length of mains: 




383,247' 


Total Water Services:* 






Metered Services 




2,759 


Unmetered services 




264 


Summer services 




186 


Total Water Services 




3,209 




1970 


1971 


Water Usage (Gallons) 


408,907,700 417,307,900 



*approximate figures 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Edmund P. Gillis 



Total Construction 
Total Fees Collected 



1970 
$2,667,708.00 
2,981.00 



1971 
$2,693,326.00 
3,442.00 



Since I have taken office in April of 1971, I have 
attended meetings of the Ipswich Planning Board, 
Zoning Board of Appeals, and some Selectmen's meet- 
ings. The gentlemen in these boards have been of 
great help to me in trying to enforce the Building 
Code and Protective Zoning By Laws. This department 
has worked very closely with the Town Manager and 
Town Counsel and I greatly acknowledge their full 
cooperation and assistance. 




31 




RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
James H. Daly, Director 



The year 1971 was one of progress in that several 
established programs were continued and new ones 
were developed benefitting a wide variety of age 
groups. All were carried out with a minimum cost to 
the town and with substantial assistance from Ipswich 
organizations, individuals and the continued cooperation 
of several town departments. 

Highly successful was the summer playground season 
that attracted an overall daily attendance of between 
400 and 500 youngsters at eight different locations. 
Among the features of the eight week program were 
visits by the Franklin Park Zoomobile, the Boston 
Stagemobile, the Sand Sculpture contest at the beach 
sponsored by the V.F.W. and trips to Fenway Park in 
Boston and Lincoln Amusement Park in Dartmouth. 

Equally successful was the Swim instruction program 
which was attended by 450 youngsters in many age 
groups from beginners through Senior Lifesavers. Once 
again the instruction was given at Hood's Pond under 
the able supervision of Ruth Norwood and her staff. 
It is expected that over 500 youngsters will be 
involved in the 1972 program, the details of which are 
circulated in June through the school system. 

Most popular in February was the school vacation 
program that annually provides youngsters with a full 
week of activities including ice and roller skating, gym 
activities, bowling etc. 



Wintertime programs of basketball and volleyball for 
all age groups, male and female are continuing at 
several locations and new indoor programs for adult 
men and women have been initiated in the school 
gyms. All are offered free of cost to the participants. 
Free lance skating and impromptu hockey activity has 
been enjoyed by many at both Baker's Pond within 
Daniel Boone Park and at the Linebrook playground 
rink. Both are natural ice areas and as such are at the 
mercy of the elements, that is, snow and rain storms, 
unseasonable thaws, etc. Accompanying maintenance 
problems are both multiple and frustrating. 

Members of the Golden Age club enjoyed eight bus 
trips, an outdoor picnic at Crane Castle, their annual 
Installation Banquet, a Christmas party at the V.F.W. 
hall and a theatre-dinner party locally. Alex Poirier is 
the current President of the active club that meets on 
the first and third Tuesdays of each month (when not 
travelling) at 2 p.m. in the K of C hall, Topsfield 
Road. Membership is always open to residents of 
Ipswich and Rowley who have reached their 60th 
birthday. In the case of couples, both spouses are 
eligible providing at least one has attained the age of 
sixty. 

Adopted by the Recreation department in 1971 
was the Pony baseball program made up of three 
teams of boys in the 13-16 age bracket. Bats, balls 
and catchers' equipment were provided by the town 
while uniforms were sponsored by the V.F.W., Rep. 
Jim Moseley, Carleton Ambulance Service and a host 
of friends. It is expected that this program will 
expand in 1972. 

Organized and activated was a highly successful 
Men's Softball league involving 16 teams and upwards 
o\' 320 players. Two leagues, Twilighters and Week- 



"Clean-up campaign is underway at the Heard House, (1971 
Town Meeting Acquired Property). Clean-up was done by 
Recreation and other Town Departments. " 




32 



enders were active on three fields from early April to 
mid September. Expansion of this program in 1972 is 
a foregone conclusion. For the most part all teams 
were self supporting. 

Street hockey popularity amongst boys 16 years of 
age and under will likely prompt the start of an 
organized program in the fall of 1972. In the interim, 
hockey cages have been constructed and placed at stra- 
tegic locations. 

PARKS 

Foremost amongst the 1971 accomplishments was 
the establishment of a new playground in the outer 
Linebrook area. Some 18 acres of land were made 
available by Al Casali at no cost to the town. Four 
major pieces of playground equipment were installed 
and a ball field was developed in the open area be- 
hind Casali's restaurant off Linebrook Road at the 
Turnpike. The new facilities were widely used by 
children in that area. 




"First Annual Street Fair by the Playground Children in 
downtown Ipswich. " 




In other projects a new softball field was started 
on school property behind the Doyon school which 
will become usable this summer. Following serious 
vandalism, the lighthouse cottage at the beach has been 
restored to excellent condition. Repairs and redecora- 
tions, however, brought about a late start of rentals. 
The cottage is used by local organizations and family 
groups at a minimum cost. 

Improvements were made at the Hood's pond swim 
instruction area; three tennis courts at Linebrook play- 
ground were repaired, repainted and new nets installed; 
fencing and a baseball backstop were installed at the 
Great Neck playground which will be completed this 
year with the development of a tot area, the installa- 
tion of equipment and additional fencing. 

Beyond projects already mentioned, Park department 
crews carried out maintenance of an estimated 50 
acres of park land, playgrounds, the beach parking lot, 
two beaches at the Neck causeway, two baseball fields, 
three softball fields, four Little League fields and three 
playground softball fields. 

With summer athletic activities constantly increasing 
and open spaces at a premium, plans are underway to 
light up the softball area behind the Doyon school for 
double use. Further improvements are planned at 
Hood's Pond and other areas this year. 



"Giant Lobster in the Making" 

Recreation Department 1971 Annual Sand Castle Contest 
at Crane 's Beach. 



1 % 




%Sm, 



33 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 



Walter Hulbert 




The death rate in 1971 was high, resulting in 117 
interments, compared with 85 in 1970. 

Two eight grave, six four grave, five two grave and 
two singles were sold with perpetual care. Converted 
from annual to perpetual care were four, four grave 
lots and one two grave lot. Awarded by the American 
Legion for veterans and their familys were seven four 
grave lots and five double grave lots, with no revenue 
for care of these lots. 

Thirty monument and thirty-three marker founda- 
tions were dug and laid. Twenty one government 
markers were set for Veterans. Eighteen sets of granite 
bounds for lots sold and awarded were set. Seventy- 
seven monuments were repaired and re -set. 

One hundred twenty-nine tons of hot top was used 
to resurface three avenues in Highland Cemetery. 

Thirteen tree stumps were removed of trees taken 
down by forestry in 1970. Eleven trees felled by 
forestry department, stumps to be removed in 1972. 

To continue our turf building program in 1972, 
445,000 sq. feet of turf builder and three and one 
half tons of lime were purchased. 

On our equipment replacement program, we pur- 
chased four new rotary mowers and two new power 
trimmers for trimming around monuments and shrubs. 



A new Giant Vac was purchased to clean up falling 
leaves due to the no burning law. 

The area at left of main entrance was rough graded 
to be finished in 1972. 

During the winter months the avenues were plowed 
with Cemetery four wheel drive, which is also used 
day and night during heavy snow storms to assist the 
public works department in clearing roads and parking 
areas. 

In order to maintain the high standards set for this 
department, the following programs are in operation: 



Equipment maintenance and replacement 

program 
General grounds developing program 
Avenue resurfacing program 
Tree replacement program 
Graves raised and refinished 

(older sections all cemeteries) 
Turf building program 
Monument restoration program 



started 1964 

started 1965 

started 1965 

started 1966 

started 1966 

started 1966 

started 1970 



Following is a list of receipts for services rendered 
by the department in 1971: 



Openings for interments 
Sectional liners 
Chapel Tent Rental 
New Graves & Lots 
Annual Care 
Foundations & Bounds 
Perpetual Care Income 
flower Fund Income 
Hannah Clark Fund 
Misc. 

New Perpetual Care deposits 
New Flower Fund Deposit 



$ 7,521.00 

1,100.00 

870.00 

1 ,700.00 

663.10 

1.365.80 

6,700.00 

270.00 

30.00 

90.00 

S20,309.90 

2,665.00 

250.00 

$ 2,915.00 



Unexpended 1971 budget unconfirmed at time of 
this report. All above figures as of date of report. 



LIBRARY 

Penny Crowley, Librarian 

James Allan, former U.S. Commissioner of Educa- 
tion introduced the "Right to Read" concept as a 
challenge to the 1970's indicating that the right to 
read is as fundamental as "the right to life, liberty 
and the pursuit of happiness". 

The Ipswich Public Library wishes to express its 
commitment to this goal and its continuing challenge 
for the years ahead. 

The coming of the Seventies, too, has seen the 
impact of an awakened sense of social responsibility at 
many levels and in many areas — educationally, econo- 
mically, ecologically, and politically. 




34 



Your Public Library, in assuming a role of leader- 
ship in this area, reflects this new social awareness in 
its role as a center for the distribution of information 
on consumer education, social problems, environmental 
education, local planning, and on State and Federal 
legislation affecting the consumer and the environment, 
to name but a few areas in which information is 
sought. 

Our goal is to continue to supply to the 
community the most up-to-date and authoritative 
information on any topic, provide the resources for 
recreational and educational reading; to act as the 
focal point of community-oriented programs, and to 
serve as resource back-up for the schools of Ipswich. 

In June the Children's Room was renovated - a 
much needed refurbishing made possible through the 
bequest of Miss Lydia Harris. Bright, sunny colors 
present an inviting atmosphere in which to browse, 
read, and enjoy story hours. The new shelving installa- 
tion has eased somewhat the overcrowding of the 
book collection, making its use easier. 

Through the active support of the Friends of the 
Library, it has been possible to initiate a number of 
new services including delivery of books to the house- 
bound and the installation of a revolving deposit 
collection at Cable Memorial Hospital. 

The Friends' volunteer in-service program continues 
to lend valuable support to the library staff. 

1971 was an active year in special program offer- 
ings presented by the Friends; productions ranging 
from an evening of poetry with local poets John 
Updike and Bill Downey, to children's programs 
involving local talent, and film productions. 

Through the generosity of the Friends, the Library 
acquired a 16 millimeter sound projector, as well as a 
substantial addition to the Children's record collection. 

In cooperation with the Historical Commission, the 
Historical Society, Ipswich High School and the 
Friends of the Library, a project known as "Ipswich 



Speaks" was launched. Tape recorded interviews are 
conducted with local citizens whose "memory banks" 
will be tapped as a valuable historical resource. 

Cooperation with, and back-up for the schools con- 
tinues at a high level with between seven and ten 
classroom visits a week for a program of library 
instruction; deposit collections supplement the book 
resources of the elementary schools. 

In response to ever-increasing demands being placed 
on the Reference Department, the reference collection 
has been strengthened with the addition of several 
special subject encyclopedias, directory sources and an 
investment service. 

Interlibrary loan service requests have increased to 
over 100 a year, and through the library's participa- 
tion in the Eastern Regional Library System, film, 
reference and inter-library loan service is enhanced by 
ever-increasing public library support at the State level. 

The Board of Library Trustees in 1971 voted to 
hire the architectural firm of Design Alliance to 
develop plans for an expansion to the library facility 
which, in addition to alleviating overcrowding, will 
enable the Library to bring to the Town of Ipswich 
an expanded range of modern library services. 

Following the re-registration of all borrowers in 
1971, current records show a total of 4,300 active 
borrowers which represents approximately 40% of the 
population. A total of 137,079 library materials were 
circulated; 2,866 books were added, bringing the total 
book collection up to 48,292. 

The Library is open from 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. Evening hours are Monday 
through Thursday 6:30 - 8:30 and the Library is open 
on Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Children's 
Room hours are the same as those for the Library 
with the exception of evening hours. 

Service is our business . . . the best in information, 
recreation and education. Let your library have the 
opportunity to serve you soon. 



ELECTRIC ADVISORY BOARD 

Seated : 

John Pechilis 

George Bouchard, Chairman 

Thomas Ercoline, Jr. 

Lawrence Sweetser 

Standing: 

Alfred Tobiasz, Manager 

George Taylor 

John Ward 

Alexander Sweenie, Jr. 

(Not present: Alan Whitehead & Eugene Ames) 

During the year the electric rates in all classifica- 
tions were increased an average of approximately 8.5%. 
This was necessary to offset the increase in cost of 
labor, materials and wholesale power purchased from 
our supplier New England Power Company. 




35 



CONSTRUCTION COMPLETED IN 1971 



1. A 13,800 volt spacer cable circuit was installed 
from Argilla Road through Heartbreak Road and 
terminating on Essex Road. A step down trans- 
former bank was installed on Heartbreak Road. 
13,800 volt spacer cable was extended along Plea- 
sant Street and part of Brownville Avenue taking in 
Ryan Avenue and Blaisdell Terrace. This work will 
supply additional power to these areas. 

2. Substation No. 4 construction has been completed 
and the new 7500 KVA transformer and associated 
switch gear put into operation. A second back-up 
tie line with New England Power Company trans- 
mission line has been installed and put into opera- 
tion. 

3. 750 feet of underground cable was installed on 
Caroline Avenue to Whittier Park to supply addi- 
tional power to the new housing units. 450 feet of 
underground cable was installed along Heard Drive 
and 1,040 feet installed on Mulholland Drive. 

4. 58 street lighting fixtures, 43 overhead services and 
41 underground services, 5 poles, 26,603 feet of 
overhead wire and 10,376 feet of underground cab- 
les and 2,525 KVA of transformer capacity were 
added to the system. 

5. Overhead cable was extended on Charlotte Road, 
Randall Road, Sagamore Road and to property off 
Town Farm Road to supply power to new homes. 

MAINTENANCE 

33 overhead and 5 underground services, 46 poles 
and 134 street lighting fixtures were replaced with 
units of higher lumen rating. 





STATISTICS 






Year 


Average KWH used 


KW Peak 


Meters in 




Residential Customers 


Demand 


Service 


1951 


1500 


2750 


2995 


1956 


2102 


3940 


3392 


1961 


2823 


6100 


3413 


1966 


3557 


8350 


3704 


1971 


5170 


11450 


4422 



CONSTRUCTION PROPOSED 1972 

1 . Convert existing cable circuit on High Street from 
substation No. 4 High Street to Rowley, Mass. to 
13,200 volts. 

2. Convert existing 4160 volt circuit on East Street, 
Jeffreys Neck Road and Little Neck Road to a 
point just beyond intersection of Plover Hill Road 
and Little Neck Road including Mulholland Drive to 
13,200 volts. 

3. Install stepdown transformer bank on Little Neck 
Road and Plover Hill Road. 

4. Install new street lighting fixtures on various streets. 

5. Continue installation of underground wiring on 
Heard Drive, Dudley Way, Hodgkins Drive, Mulhol- 
land Drive and Pasture Way. 

6. Install underground wiring to approximately 100 
apartments to be constructed off Topsfield Road. 

GENERATION 

Maintenance was carried out by station personnel 
and all units at the end of the year were in good 
operating condition. 

The annual peak demand was 1 1 ,450 KW on 
December 20, 1971 which represents an increase of 
2% over last year. 




"Arnold Comeau checks the flash boards at the 
Dow 's Brook Reservoir. " 



36 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Irving Small, Chairman 
Jacob Israelsohn 
William Smith 
Jessie Girard 
Gordon Burlingham 
John Eby 

Maryruth Williamson 
Peter Zervas 
Alfred D. Castantini 

The Committee has devoted its efforts during the 
past year to the drafting of a report supplemental to 



our earlier report to the Board of Selectmen on the 
subject of revision and codification of the Town 
By-laws. We completed our work in this area in the 
late summer of 1971. 

Since the time of submission of our original report 
nearly a year ago, we have not had an official 
response from the Board of Selectmen to the question 
of how — and to what extent — they might wish the 
Committee to undertake to implement the recommend- 
ations comprehended in the report. Neither have we 
received a new commission from the Board of Select- 
men in the interim. The Chairman has, therefore, not 
convened Committee meetings since the end of August. 




IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 



667 -C — Housing for the Elderly — The present 
housing consists of sixty-two apartments with an aver- 
age monthly rent of $47.05 per month, which includes 
all utilities except telephone. The rent is based on 25 
per cent of the total income of the tenant. 



There are twenty units at Southern Manor off 
County Road and forty-two units at Caroline Avenue 
off Broadway Avenue. Each unit has a living room, 
kitchen and bedroom and bath and is equiped with a 
stove and refrigerator. 



In December the Housing Authority opened up an 
additional fifty-eight elderly units at Caroline Avenue, 
under Program 667-3. These units are identical to the 
existing units at Caroline Avenue. This now brings the 
total number of elderly units to 120. 



Jane Bokron, Director 

John Thatcher, Jr., Chairman 

Stanley Eustace 

Glenfred Wanzer 

Arthur Weagle 

Alexander Bernhard, State Appointee 



The Ipswich Housing Authority, organized in 1947, 
supervises two developments in the Town of Ipswich, 
Veterans' Project 200-1 and Housing for the Elderly, 
Project 667-C and manages the Rent Subsidy Program 
Chapter 707, all with State Funds. 



200-1 Veterans' Housing - This project is made up 
of seven buildings, comprising of twenty-four apart- 
ments of two and three bedroom units. Each unit has 
its own gas furnace, hot water heater and gas stove. 
The Authority pays for the water and the tenant pays 
all other utilities. The average shelter rent is $74 per 
month which is based on the number of dependents 
and gross income per family. 



Rent Subsidy Chapter 707 — is a program which 
provides rent subsidies for low income families when 
public housing is not available. This program also ex- 
tends to the elderly people. It allows the Authority to 
rent private units and to pay a rent supplement to 
make up the difference in the agreed total monthly 
rent for the apartment. In 1971, the Authority paid 
$53,815 in rent subsidies to private landlords. 



In 1971, the Housing Authority set up a Tenants 
Organization in which representatives from each pro- 
ject, appointed by the tenants of the project attend 
regular meetings to voice grievances and suggestions 
from their respective projects to the Authority. 



In December the Authority appointed Miss Jane 
Bokron as a new full time Executive Director upon 
the resignation of Mr. Karras. The Authority has 
grown from its original twenty-four units to now over 
200 units along with the complexities involved which 
necessitates to elevations of the position of Executive 
Director to full time. 



37 



'pswich League of Women Vot- 
ers members put on costumes 
it the Whipple House in pre- 
wation for Olde Ipswich Days 
veek. They strolled on the 
\outh Green, selling old fash- 
oned root beer and giving 
lony rides. L-R Mrs. Douglas 
Holland and her son, Scott, 
4rs. Ray Broekel, Mr. Robert 
~)uffy, Mrs. Roger Edmonds 
nd Mrs. Phillip Stambaugh. 

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FIRST ROW (/L-R/ 
Mrs. M. L. Sc udder 
Mr. Edwin H. Damon , Jr. 
Mr. Ray Broekel 



Term Expires 
1972 
1974 
1973 



SECOND ROW (L-r I 

Mr. Walter .1. I'ojasek 
Mr. Edward ■/. Michon 

Mr. Robert Weatlierall 
Mr. I'eter . I. /.ervas 



Term Expires 
1973 
19 74 
1972 
1972 




SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
John H. Stella 

While total enrollment increased by 28 students 
over October 1, 1970 space continues to be a vexing 
problem for our schools. We do not have room in our 
present educational plant to house all our students. It 
is still necessary to rent the Boone Hall facility and in 
September 1971 we rented the basement of the 
Baptist Church. Presently there are 101 students at 
Boone Hall and 66 in the Baptist Church. 

On October 1, 1971 our total school enrollment 
was 2802 an increase of 1% over 1970. This increase 



was the lowest in several years but all indications 
point to a substantial growth over the next few years. 

Our High School which has an optimum capacity of 
650 had an enrollment of 802. The extended day and 
the Open Campus Plan authorized by the School Com- 
mittee went into effect in September 1971 for Juniors 
and Seniors. During the last several weeks prior to 
school closing in June the Seniors only were on the 
Open Campus Plan. Because of the success experienced 
the Plan was extended to Juniors and Seniors in the 
Fall of 1971. 

The School Committee approved, after many meet- 
ings at which time several alternatives were proposed, 
a 900 pupil High School, Grades 9-12. The School 
Buildings Needs Committee was given this direction 
and many hours of meetings were held to bring this 
proposal to the State School Building Assistance 
Bureau. 

In December of 1971 a joint meeting of representa- 
tives of the School Buildings Needs Committee and 
School Committee was held in Boston with Mr. Elton 
Smith, School Plant Specialist, State School Building 
Assistance Bureau. From all indications it appears that 
the 900 pupil High School educational specifications 
would be accepted by the State. Enacted during 1971 
was Chapter 1010 of the Legislative Acts which in- 
creased the reimbursement for school construction 
grants from 50% to 65%. In addition 65% of the cost 
of the interest to finance such school construction 
grants will be borne by the State. This is a tremen- 
dous assist to the taxpayers of Ipswich. 



40 



The third attempt to convince the townspeople to 
approve a new High School is planned for early 1972. 

The new proposed 900 pupil High School will give 
the Ipswich Schools additional spaces at all levels. 

— The present High School will be utilized for a 
Grade 7, 8 Junior High School. The optimum capacity 
of the present High School is 650. The projected 
enrollment of the largest two grades (present Grades 4, 
5) for 1974 is 450. This leaves additional spaces, 
approximately 200, for anticipated growth. 

— Upon completion of the High School, the present 
Junior High School will be utilized as a Grade 5, 6 
School. The present enrollment of the two largest 
grades (present Grades 4, 5) is 450. The optimum 
capacity of the present Junior High School is 500. 
This would result in 50 additional spaces for antici- 
pated growth. 

— The optimum capacity of the Shatswell, Win- 
throp, Burley and Doyon Schools is 1325. The present 
K-4 enrollment totals 1115 leaving 210 additional 
spaces for anticipated growth at these levels. 

The Ipswich Public Schools were funded for two 
positions under the Federal Emergency Employment 
Act. The position of Research and Development Aide 
was filled on November 22, 1971 and the Bus-Driver - 
Maintenance Worker was funded in late December. An 
appointment will be made in early 1972. Both posi- 
tions were approved and authorized by the School 



Committee and funded 100% by the Federal Govern- 
ment. 

The Whittier Regional Technical and Vocational 
High School is about 25% completed and when it 
becomes operational ^in 1973 approximately 150-180 
Ipswich students^will -he eligible for enrollment. 

It is the conviction of the Administration that our 
changing technological environment has placed new 
demands upon the educational system and has led to 
a partnership of work and education. The Whittier 
School will allow students to explore the world of 
work and our present High School philosophy should 
not only concentrate on the academic aspects of 
educations but on career training as well. Space limita- 
tions frustrate our programs, however. 

The reports from the principals of the schools and 
the supervisors list the accomplishments of the past 
year and the progress being made in the schools. 

My sincere appreciation is extended to the School 
Committee for their untiring devotion and dedication 
to meeting the educational needs of our youth. 

I extend to the administrators, teachers, custodians, 
secretaries, cafeteria workers, and all others my sincere 
appreciation for their excellent cooperation. Finally I 
extend to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
Police, Highway, Fire Departments and other town 
officials my sincere appreciation for their excellent 
cooperation with the schools. 



Enrollment 

Grade 9 
Grade 10 
Grade 11 
Grade 12 

Totals 



Boys 



Girls 



Total 



09 


113 


222 


03 


118 


221 


93 


86 


179 


86 


108 


194 



391 



425 



816 



Our enrollment increased by 72 pupils during the 
academic year 1971-1972; in six years we have grown 
by 155 pupils. 



I. Teaching Personnel 

No teacher additions were made this year 
were six resignations and six replacements. 



there 



In an effort to continue to employ the best quali- 
fied teachers, much time was spent in seeking the best 
possible . candidates. Ipswich has hand picked well 
experienced and well educated personnel; the majority 
of the staff possess master's degrees and advanced 
graduate study. 

II. Curriculum 

Our greatest innovative programs were in the areas 
of curriculum. 

Due to overcrowding we were forced to examine 
the possibilities of greater building and personnel utiliz- 
ation. A committee of parents, pupils and teachers, 
after a thorough investigation, suggested an extended 
school day. Our present school day consists of 9 




HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Joseph Rogers 

periods of 47 minutes plus passing time — no specific 
lunch periods are scheduled. Pupils eat lunch during 
their free time — breakfast is also served. The cafe- 
teria maintains a snack bar serving quick lunches in 
addition to Class A federally subsidized meals. 

The school day operates from 7:40 to 3:30. We 
feel we are utilizing the plant, and personnel to full 
capacity with evening school and adult recreation 
rounding out full utilization. 



41 



Our junior and senior pupils are on an Open 
Campus Program. They are required to be in school 
only during their scheduled classes and homeroom. 
Regular in-school programs are supplemented by a 
variety of out-of-school seminars, lectures, volunteer 
work, and volunteer teaching at the elementary and 
junior high school. 

The entire English course of study was revised from 
a sequential 4 year program, with specific required 
courses, to a full elective program. Changes in U.S. 
History, Art, Music, Home Economics, Science, Busi- 
ness Education have enhanced our curriculum. Pupils 
now have greater selection and choice, and as a result, 
many of them are electing many more courses than 
are required. 

Much of the curriculum change was done with 
pupil involvement and made on the basis of pupil 
recommendation. Our co-curricula program has been 
expanded to include a newly revised school newspaper, 
a film producing and viewing club, an expanded music- 
organization, additional intramural sports and physical 
education activities. The school's Math league has done 
an outstanding job in representing our school. 

III. Pupil Personnel 

Although not to the full satisfaction of all of our 
pupils, they are becoming more and more involved in 
the total school picture. Faculty meetings now have 
pupil representation and the Student Council hopes to 
be represented on our School Committee. The change- 
over in the school to Open Campus and open cafeteria 
has given our pupils greater responsibilities toward 
self-direction and self-discipline. Most have handled this 
responsibility quite well. The school still must play a 
custodial role and most of our pupils respect and look 
for this type of direction and management. 

We hope to produce resourceful, bright and self- 
directed individuals who can make wise choices and 
decisions in their present and future lives. Through 
greater pupil involvement and participation in our total 
school program, we feel we are nearing this objective. 



Our effort toward a true comprehensive secondary 
school program is nearing its goal. However, we need 
to give our exceptional pupils greater attention and 
help. Although our drop-out rate is very low 2 to 
4% - we must expand our programs to care for the 
needs of every pupil. 

IV. Building and Grounds 

No major improvements were made this year 
regular maintenance and minor repairs have continued 
to keep the building in good condition. However, due 
to the constant use of the facility, which is as it 
should be, additional maintenance will be needed. 
Vandalism, while present and costly, is not an over- 
riding factor as long as vigilance is maintained. Fifteen 
classrooms were painted during the summer. 

Outside maintenance, due to extensive use of 
grounds by school and other town groups, has 
increased greatly. Yearly seeding and resodding is 
necessary on all playing fields as these are in constant 
use. 

V. Conclusion 

1. While the extended school day has alleviated 
some of the problems of crowding, it has caused a 
certain detachment between faculty, pupils and admini- 
stration. This is due to pupils and teachers coming 
and leaving at various times. 

2. In spite of overcrowding our faculty has 
responded very well to the needs of our pupils. They 
have given time and effort toward the improvement of 
courses, efficiency and building utilization. 

3. Additional physical facilities are needed urgently 
to accommodate an increasing population and an 
expanding program. 

4. Greater provisions must be made for our excep- 
tional and atypical pupils, so that we can meet the 
needs of all children in Ipswich. 




JR. HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 
John Huttenan 



Organization 

The Junior High School enrollment figures increased 
from four hundred and forty as of October 1, 1970 
to four hundred and fifty-two on October 1, 1971. 

We have continued the modular scheduling which 
was instituted in the fall of 1970. As mentioned in 
last years report, this system of scheduling enables us 
to couple a longer time block (forty-six minutes) with 
a shorter time block (twenty nine minutes). This 
allows sufficient time for meaningful science labs and 
complete lessons in the specialty areas such as shop, 
physical education and home economics. 

In addition, we have continued to offer a program 
of "mini" courses or electives. Typical electives are 
photography, macrame, history of Ipswich, ceramics, 
Spanish, cooking for boys, guitar, first aid, etc. These 
courses encourage the students to become involved in 
offerings other than the required curriculum and have 
proven to be very popular with both students and 



42 



teachers. We have had a great deal of interest on the 
part of girls in taking shop. However, the shop is 
utilized to the maximum by the boys who are 
required to take two periods of shop each week. The 
same situation exists with our single home economics 
room and many boys who have shown a keen interest 
in basic cooking courses are unable to become 
involved. Under consideration by our practical arts 
staff is a possible alteration in our basic scheduling 
and curriculum so that home economics and wood 
shop would be an elective rather than a required 
course during one of the two years a student is at 
the junior high school. 

Buildings and Grounds 

During the past summer the trim and windows on 



three sides of the annex were painted. In addition, 
trim and windows were painted on portions of three 
sides of the main building. As usual, most of the 
building maintenance monies are spent on repairing, 
replacing and mending of old water pipes, electrical 
circuits, plumbing fixtures, and "tired" doors and fix- 
tures that have seen thirty-five years of heavy use. 

Conclusion: 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
superintendent, school committee, and citizens of 
Ipswich for the continued support they have given to 
the junior high school. The staff at the junior high 
school will continue to work toward quality education 
which is meaningful and practical. 



"Jr. High School Students 
presentation of the musical 
'Oliver '. " 





"Mini courses at the Jr. High 
School are becoming more popu- 
lar with the students. " 



43 





PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 
William E. Waitt, Jr. 

1971, like many years before, saw numerous 
changes in our schools. Some exciting, some disap- 
pointing, some pointing to modernization of our pro- 
grams. We at Doyon, continue to look forward to 
even more challenging opportunities to provide the 
best possible education for the children we serve. 

The entire staff and I feel that we should temper 
our teaching with the tested methodology of the past, 
mixed generously with the exciting and effervescent 
ideas of the present, to provide a modern education 
for the citizens of the 1990's and beyond. 

Organization 

During the first half of 1971, we continued to 
occupy the two basement rooms of St. Stanislaus 
Church for two first grades. By September these 
rooms were closed because of a decrease in grade one 
enrollments, and the students and teachers were trans- 
ferred to other schools. 

On the first day of school, Doyon opened its doors 
to 535 students housed as follows: three sections each 
of grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6: three sections of 
special education (one educable, one trainable, one for 
emotionally disturbed) plus the four sections of kinder- 
garten. 

Teaching Personnel 

In June, Miss Ruth Gilday, and Miss Mary Bond, 
two of our more experienced and valuable staff mem- 
bers retired. We miss their services greatly. 



During the summer months eight other teachers 
resigned and were replaced. The staff now consists of 
thirty-four full and part time personnel, including all 
specialists and teachers. 

Eight student teachers and three student teacher 
aides completed their training in our classrooms during 
the year. 

Regular classroom work was aided by a corp of 
twenty-two volunteer mothers who have operated our 
library with great professional dedication. We are 
indebted to them. 

Six other adults have assisted with our continuing 
Great Books program. 

Curriculum 

Work has continued in developing an individualized 
approach to teaching with major emphasis on the 
math and reading skills area. Continuous progress math 
labs are in classrooms from grade two to grade six 
and multi-level individualized reading kits are in use in 
many classrooms. 

Two first grade teachers are piloting the new Har- 
court reading program at no cost to the town, and 
our new social studies program is being piloted in a 
second grade. 

Mr. William Taplin, a sixth grade staff member, 
organized and conducted a unique Title I summer 
school program. The program consisted of a science - 
ecology centered remedial reading program with a 
number of field trips to maintain a high level of 
interest. 

General 

Several new members were added to the service 
stall in order to implement a new carryout lunch pro- 
gram. We now cook for Burley, Shatswell and Baptist 
schools making use of our modern kitchen facilities. 

Mrs. Barbara Jackson, our cafeteria director, 
succeeded in obtaining federal funds to augment our 
equipment. A vertical Cutter Mixer, a new roll-in oven, 
a braiser and a new steamer were added at a fraction 
of their true cost. Our older equipment was trans- 
ferred to other schools. 

Our school now has a service staff of two full time 
and two part time custodians, three lunch aides, seven 
cafeteria workers and a secretary. 



WINTHROP SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 
Samuel B. Levy 

Organization : 

This year the Winthrop Elementary School students 
were all housed under a single roof with the phasing 
out of the Memorial Building classrooms. The 
Winthrop School houses a single class of grade three, 
four classes of grade four and five classes each of 
grades five and six. The enrollment as of December 
23, 1971 was 408 students. The school also houses a 
library of over 6,000 volumes which include reference 



works as well as general reading material appropriate 
to the age and interest of the students. 

For the older students there are activity groups 
with staff members serving as advisors. The activities 
include music, art, physical education, chess and an 
active student council representing all rooms. 

The school day for all students is six hours and 
fifteen minutes. Class "A" hot lunches are served to 
approximately 300 students daily. School bus trans- 
portation is provided for 209 students or 51% of the 
student population. 



44 



Winthrop School facilities are made available to 
Baptist School and Shatswell School students for 
rehearsing and staging plays and other presentations 
and activities. The Baptist School students use the 
physical education facilities one day a week. 

The Winthrop School facilities and equipment are 
used by many school, civic, church and private group 
functions and activities during after school afternoon, 
evening and week-end hours. Organizations making use 
of these facilities include Brownie Groups of the Girl 
Scouts of America, Square Dancing Clubs, Boy Scouts, 
Church Fellowship Groups, Conservation Activities and 
High School and Junior High School car washes. 

Curriculum: 

The Winthrop School provides a standard elementary 
school curriculum but not a rigid structure. Several 
staff members are using new, innovative and imagina- 
tive approaches to the curriculum which livens the 
students interest in their education. Specialists provide 
instruction in the areas of art, music and physical 
education for one period each week. Follow-up lessons 
are conducted by the classroom teachers. French 
instruction is given by a French specialist to all 
students in grades four through six several times each 
week. Instrumental music lessons are provided to over 
130 interested students in grades four, five and six. 
This year a guitar session was added to the other 
instruments being taught. A combined Winthrop-Doyon 
orchestra has been formed and a combined dance band 
is being organized. There is an active chorus of 75 
boys and girls from grades five and six. The Winthrop 
School provides for students requiring services in the 
area as specific learning disabilities and speech therapy. 
The school library is supervised by a librarian shared 
with the Doyon School and a corps of dedicated 
volunteer librarians who devote a great deal of time 
and energy to the library program. 

Teaching Personnel: 

The Winthrop School staff is made up of 15. class- 
room teachers, plus vocal music, instrumental music 




and art specialists shared with other schools, one full- 
time French tracher, a specific learning disabilities 
specialist and a part-time speech therapist. The school 
also has the services of a full-time guidance counselor, 
a part-time guidance specialist and a consulting psycho- 
logist. The Winthrop School participates in the 
teacher-training programs with Gordon College and 
Salem State College. 

Many staff members are engaged in post graduate 
study at area and Boston colleges and universities. All 
staff members are involved in regularly scheduled 
workshops in the areas of curriculum development, 
individualized instruction, math and music. Five staff 
members are new to the Winthrop School with three 
of this number new to Ipswich. 

A nurse, secretary, two full-time custodians, two 
lunchroom aides and five cafeteria workers complete 
the staff of the Winthrop School. 



The Burley, Shatswell, Baptist and Boone Hall 
Schools employ 24 regular staff members as well as 
13 shared teachers in the areas of Music, Art, Physical 
Education, French, Guidance, Remedial Reading, 
Perceptually Handicapped, Instrumental Music, Speech 
Therapy and Emotionally Disturbed. 

The main thrust of my report this year will feature 
the new facility at the Baptist Church on Central St. 
and the changes accomplished at the Burley School. 

BURLEY SCHOOL 

There are eight homerooms of multi-age children 
divided as follows: 

2 classes of first and second year, 

2 classes of second and third year, and 

4 classes of third and fourth year. 

Children remain in these homeroom groups from 
8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. each day for opening 
exercises, milk and lunch collections, and attendance 
and other planned activities. 




BURLEY, SHATSWELL, BAPTIST AND 
BOONE HALL PRINCIPAL 

Henry S. Dembowski 



45 




"Mrs. Dorothy A. Hammerslcy. devoted and amiable teacher for 

many years, received a money bouquet from her fellow workers 
on her retirement. " 



At 9:00 a.m. all children proceed to the 
appropriate Language Arts Group. Language Arts 
includes all reading skills, penmanship, creative writing, 
poetry, composition, as well as reading for pleasure. 
The building uses the Open Court Publishing Co's 
approach to reading in Grade 1 and continues with 
Sullivan's Programmed Reader in Grades 2 and 3. 
Grade 4 continues in its current multi-basal program. 



At mid-day children report back to their 
homerooms for lunch. 

The afternoon is spent in the homeroom situation 
during which the remainder of academics are 
presented, with the exception of math. It is during 
this part of the day, using science and social studies 
as the tool, that each teacher attempts to teach 
self-discipline and self-direction to include decision 
making and the choosing and assessing of priorities 
within the subject areas. 

The principal has asked each teacher to try to 
develop one half { l fi) hour each day during the 
afternoon that is child directed. The teacher has been 
given the authority to lessen or expand the time 
according to the degree of success she achieves. 

The children are regrouped for one hour in the 
afternoon for math according to achievement level. 

In addition to the above academics each child in 
the building receives one formal period of music, one 
formal period of art, and one formal period of 
physical education. The fourth year students have 
three twenty minute French periods. 

One recess is scheduled for the day. 

BAPTIST SCHOOL 

New green carpeting underfoot, shiny wood paneling 
surrounding us. a hundred exciting ideas waiting to be 
tried, and a genuine church protecting us overhead - 
surely, the Baptist School staff, thought Heavenly 
Peace was guaranteed. 

Our doubts began not long after our gleaming new 
open-space room was filled with 66 eager second and 
third year children, last-minute electricians, plumbers, 
building inspectors, and telephone men, and the usual 
group of curious parents. Undaunted by the fact that 



"Shatswell school teacher. Miss Hamjel. holds an informal class. " 




46 



our huge room seemed to have visibly shrunk and 66 
voices could create a din matched only by the fans at 
a Bruins game, we cheerfully put into effect our 
"Super-Plan". In the course of a given day, every 
child would meet with every teacher, would be 
exposed in some direct way to every other child, and 
would be offered valid choice in schedule and 
activities. Within three days, we were awash in a sea 
of lists and schedules spending most of our time 
directing traffic, and asking each other where we went 
next. But we didn't give up. Not until one small boy 
offered his three o'clock evaluation: "Well, I did Math 
all day today. I stayed right in one place, every 
teacher helped me and I sure learned a lot of math! 
Do we read tomorrow?" 

Heaven, we concluded, is earned, not bestowed. 
Like the children, we must learn to cope with a new 
kind of physical space, and the learning must be built, 
step by step, beginning with what we already knew 
about individualized instruction and activity oriented 
learning. Starting afresh with more stabilized groupings 
of children and more clearly defined areas of 
operation for given groups at given times, we decided 
to let our use of large space and variety in grouping 
come naturally as an answer to specific needs as they 
arose. Not until we let the program determine the use 
of space rather than letting the space control our 
activities did we make progress. 

What have we as teachers learned? 

— that the "Proceed with Caution" warnings, 
offered so many times by experts in activity-centered, 
open classroom education, are to be heeded. 

— that expecting children to deal responsibly with a 
room three times the size of what they are familiar 
with is unrealistic unless they first learn to care for 
materials and housekeeping chores in an area small 
enough for them to control and to be proud of. 

— that individualizing instruction does not require 
any particular ability groupings, space allotments, or 
transferring of children from teacher to teacher. If 
learning is truly individualized, the need for all of 
these disappears except for temporary purposes. 

— that an open-space classroom without certain core 
facilities presents some annoying problems which would 
not appear if such a classroom were part of a whole 
school building. Surrounding such a room should be a 
music center, gym, special project room, and areas for 
silent study, for example. Visual distractions are coped 
with more easily at Baptist than are the auditory 
ones. 

— that gradually we find ourselves using the space 
more and more flexibly. Daily instructional groups 
range in size from one to 66. Teaching becomes more 
efficient when teachers can determine individual needs 
and divide a large group of children three ways to 
provide instruction in particular skills, grouping and 
regrouping constantly as needs change. 



— that sharing of materials and responsibilities is 
not only a necessity but also comes without effort 
when teachers work jointly in the same room with the 
same children. 




"Mrs. Fowler 's Social STudies class from the Shatswell School. " 



On the lighter side, we've learned that with the 
exit door, the bathrooms, the bubbler, and the sink 
all placed in one cozy corner, somebody's teaching 
area can be a lot like the Mystic Bridge at 5 p.m.; 
that while three classes usually "own" twelve walls on 
which to display their achievements, we have the 
equivalent of only eight: that it's a long 100-yard 
dash from the closet to the office telephone; that no- 
body believes you when you insist that you don't 
have the authority to hire a new organist or you 
don't know where the Bible study group is meeting! 

We have learned, too, that when the sound is that 
of busy, interested, cooperative activity and you look 
up and see 66 children learning and growing happily 
together, the thrill is three times as big. 

The Baptist School report was prepared by Barbara 
S. Beaman. 



47 



^ 








* — 



s 







DIRECTOR OF PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 
J. J. Battaglio 

I . Organization 

The Department of Pupil Personnel Services retained 
its essential structure encompassing all guidance, health, 
and special services personnel. The organization plan 
for the department winch was implemented this year 
gave us, for the first time, a standardized procedure 
for handling cases of school cluldren needing referral, 
evaluation and special placement. 

For the first time, members of the medical 
community in Ipswich were systematically notified of 
children in their care who were referred to the depart- 
ment for evaluation. Copies of the standard referral 
form were forwarded to family physicians. Establishing 
communication between the school and medical 
communities has yielded returns in the form of mutual 
cooperation and awareness of developments which can 
only be beneficial to both. 

Greater use of community resources in general was 
made this year. Residents trained under the North 
Shore Community College Teacher Aide Program were 
used to assist the teacher or emotionally disturbed 
children. Their help was voluntary, but since classes of 
this kind (also that for trainably retarded children) call 
for the services of an aide or assistant, the department 
is requesting the formal use of such personnel. 

A total of eight Brothers from LaSalette Seminary 
worked in the schools under staff personnel. Acting as 
tutors and "big brothers" to children with learning, 
social, or emotional problems, they supplemented the 
school program with personalized services which could 
be provided in no other way. 

Under the Open Campus program, we were able to 
make more extensive use of high school students as 
student aides. Presently seventeen students are spending 
a part of their school day working with children in all 
elementary schools and in the Junior High. Reports 
from counselors and teachers supervising the student 
aides are extremely complimentary and enthusiastic. 

II. Personnel 

Again this year a number of personnel changes were 
made both at counselor and special class positions. 
Economic conditions forced relocation of certain 
personnel for employment reasons. Among these, Mrs. 
Mary Lester resigned as teacher of retarded classes and 
Mrs. Karen Lake as teacher of emotionally disturbed 



classes. They were replaced by Mrs. Ellen Minshew and 
Mrs. Janet Juntunen respectively. The latter subse- 
quently resigned for personal reasons and was replaced 
by Mr. William Nicoll. Mrs. Carol Barry was added to 
teach the class for trainable retarded children at the 
Doyon School. 

Mr. Thomas Duff was reassigned under the State 
Department of Youth Services program as a school 
adjustment counselor. In this capacity, he provides 
liason services with social and community agencies 
which service our children. Additionally, as adjustment 
counselor he now provides a very necessary link 
between school and parents of cluldren with learning 
problems. 

Miss Nancy Light assumed counseling responsibilities 
at Shat swell School. Because of her specialized 
experience in working with emotionally disturbed child- 
ren, we have been able to extend this program to the 
Shatswell and Winthrop Schools. 

At the High School, Mr. Thomas McCarthy was 
replaced by Mrs. Ann Holland. 



III. New Programs and Services 

The influx of children from nursery schools for 
retarded children necessitated the re -establishment of 
the class for trainable retarded children at the Doyon 
School. The class comprises five children ranging in 
age from six to fifteen years. 

The ideas of several staff members culminated in a 
"learning center" concept at the Doyon School. The 
intent here is to provide services for referred children 
using a team teaching approach and without the use 
of labels or designations. Teachers are invited to refer 
children who need tutoring and specialized help and 
are asked to participate in the center. Staffing includes 
the teachers of all special classes, reading specialists, 
counselors and the speech therapist, when available. 
Since any child may participate, the segregation stigma 
is removed. We are presently using the space which 
houses the trainable class since this terminates after 
the morning session. The center utilizes the learning 
aids and specialized materials available from school 
resources and from special classes. 

Services for emotionally disturbed children who are 
integrated in classes at the Winthrop and Shatswell 
Schools are now available in the form of back-up 
support from Miss Light. Dr. Gofstein continues to 
provide evaluations and consulting services both for 
parents and school personnel at these schools and 
system wide. We are now in a position to accept 
referrals of children with learning problems which are 
emotionally based, from teachers at all elementary 
schools. 

A program for slow learners is now being developed 
at the High School. Among the participants are 
students who have transferred to the High School 
from special classes at the elementary and Junior High 
Schools. It is gratifying to know that in Ipswich, at 
least, we have reached a point where youngsters with 
severe disabilities have a real chance at retention 
through high school. We will of course program each 
student individually, utilizing the Work-Study Program 
and whatever other offerings seem appropriate. 



48 



Eventually, we hope to institute the learning center 
concept for this program also. 
Summary : 

Ipswich continues to meet its obligations to develop 
all its school children to their maximum potential. I 
am grateful for the sensitivity of all school officials 



including the Superintendent of Schools, School 
Committee Members and all school personnel to the 
needs of our children. Their support and cooperation 
— and that of the Ipswich community as a whole — 
have made it possible to offer exemplary programs for 
all school children. 



DIRECTOR OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Mary M. Evans 

The educational thrust during 1971 has continued 
to be toward individualizing teaching and learning. 
Toward this end in-service programs for teachers at all 
elementary levels were instituted involving "open" 
education, and materials and techniques for involving 
and stimulating both students and teachers. 

A regional Title Ill-Innovative Education project is 
now being prepared which would, if funded, have an 
impact both on the process and the basic philosophy 
of elementary education. We look forward to sharing 
in this Federal grant in the 1972-73 school year. 

Again this year, Ipswich was the recipient of a 
sizeable Federal grant for a summer program for pupils 
of grades four through six. A unique project, under 
the direction of Mr. William Taplin, of the Doyon 
School staff, was concerned with the development of 
reading skills and the ecosystems of the Ipswich 
environment. 

To improve the elementary music program Mrs. Rita 
Holland, music specialist, cooperated in writing a Title 
III-NDEA-Humanities project which implements the 
new State Curriculum Guide and serves as a pilot for 
the Commonwealth. Approval of this project was 50% 
reimbursed and provided much needed material. 
Workshops for teachers in the use of the Guide and 
materials were held in the fall. 

The Education Professions Development Act (PL 
90-35) has provided instructional aide training at North 
Shore Community College for a group now completing 
their practicum in several elementary classrooms. Their 
assistance to both teachers and pupils has been 
tremendous. 

An intensive summer program for children with 
specific learning disabilities involving perceptual 
handicaps of various kinds was successfully developed 
and directed by Mrs. Mary Bamford, learning 
disabilities specialist. The teaching was tutorial based 
on an extensive diagnosis and included physical as well 
as academic training. 

The addition of a reading specialist at Burley 
School has been of great assistance to the overall 
program. This teacher also assists children with 
perceptual-motor and related problems. 

Ipswich was asked by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich to 
pilot their new reading series in Grade One. This is 
presently being done at Doyon School with excellent 
results. The materials and consultant service are being 
supplied by the publisher at no cost to the town. 




Under the leadership of Mrs. Hollis Bucklin, a corps 
of volunteers was trained as discussion leaders for the 
Great Books program during the spring at sessions held 
at Notre Dame Novitiate. This has assured the 
continuation of this valuable elective program. A 
mini-program based on children's literature, both 
contemporary and traditional, has been developed by 
Mrs. Bucklin and Mrs. Elizabeth Bowman, of our own 
staff, on an experimental basis for children at the 
Baptist Church School. 

Supplementary cultural offerings in music and art 
continued to be offered during the school year by our 
own specialists and by outside agencies. The 
instrumental music program has far surpassed original 
expectations and the addition of a part-time teacher 
will make it possible to provide musical instruction to 
more pupils desiring it. 

The study of problems affecting the health and 
well-being of the community continue to be of 
interest to Ipswich pupils. The generosity of the 
Garden Club of Ipswich in supplying teacher's guides 
to the study of the environment for all teachers in 
the system has aided in this study. 

Ipswich participated at the fourth grade level in a 
statewide testing program in basic skills and academic 
aptitude required by the Commissioner of Education. 
The results show Ipswich in a good position 
academically when compared with students of like 
ability in other communities. 

Reporting to parents was revised from conventional 
letter grades to conferences and, by vote of the 
School Committee, was extended to all primary 
schools. 

Ipswich teachers have continued to provide 
cooperating service to students from Gordon College, 



49 



Salem State, Boston State, and Wheelock College. The 
elementary principals, too, have given of their time 
and talents in helping student teachers develop their 
potential. 

Our teachers and administrators have attended many 
educational conferences and workshops both at home 
and abroad. The Shatswell School "open" concept 
educational program has received wide recognition and 
has been host to many visitors. We in Ipswich have 
come a long way in developing quality educational 
programs in our schools. Our fine staff of teachers, 



our volunteer instructional aides, our supportive and 
interested parents have helped to make it possible. 

InterCAP, the first intra-school department 
newsletter began its publication as a monthly paper in 
February, 1971. This bulletin serves the school 
department by informing its members of happenings 
within the system and offers an opportunity for 
expressing educational ideas and opinions. 

As we move forward in the Seventies it becomes 
increasingly evident that the world is the classroom 
and it is the whole of society that educates; the 
school, one facet of that society. 



ENROLLMENT CHART - OCTOBER 1, 1971 









Non- 




Grade 




K 


gr- 


1 


Doyon 




63 




71 


Burley 








26 


Shatsw< 


ell 




210 




Boone 


Hall 


101 






Baptist 






66 




Winthrop 








Junior 


High 








Senior 


High 









8 



Sp. 



10 11 12 P.G. Ed. TOTAL 



82 77 69 76 81 
59 79 56 



29 114 134 132 

228 215 

213 218 177 198 

164 276 141 185 239 210 213 228 215 213 218 177 198 



19 


538 




220 




210 




101 




66 




409 


8 


451 




807 


27 


2802 



Grade 



ENROLLMENT CHART BY GRADES 1966 - 1971 
1966 1967 1968 1969 



1970 



1971 



K 




71 


206 


216 


187 


164 


Nongraded Primary 










204 


276 


1 


193 


190 


200 


225 


159 


97 


2 


192 


188 


190 


229 


122 


141 


3 


191 


202 


193 


188 


235 


185 


4 


178 


196 


211 


195 


203 


239 


5 


200 


188 


204 


214 


206 


210 


6 


182 


203 


198 


218 


225 


213 


7 


193 


187 


219 


226 


216 


228 


8 


188 


191 


180 


22S 


217 


215 


9 


191 


191 


185 


185 


220 


213 


10 


139 


189 


189 


195 


180 


218 


11 


120 


135 


198 


183 


197 


177 


12 


143 


122 


133 


185 


174 


198 


P.G. 




1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


Sp. Ed. 


29 


31 


23 


27 


27 


27 


TOTALS 


2139 


2285 


2531 


2715 


2774 


2802 



Boys 
Girls 



EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED TO MINORS - 1971 



Age 
14-16 

12 

11 



Age 
16-18 

21 

37 



TOTAL 

33 
48 



50 



EXPENDITURE STATEMENT - PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



I. 

II. 
III. 

IV. 

V. 
VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 



XII. 



XIII. 



Administration and Instruction 

Includes salaries of Superintendent, Administrators, Professional Staff, Secretaries, 
Instructional Materials. 

Other School Services 

Includes transportation, cafeteria salaries, nurses, salaries, health services, athletics. 

Operation and Maintenance of Plant 

Includes salaries for custodians, custodial supplies, utilities (fuel, electricity, telephone, gas, 
water, sewer), building maintenance of equipment. 



$1,970,431.44 

$ 252,395.16 
$ 258,299.57 



Fixed Charges $ 

Includes fire and extended coverage, workman's compensation, rental fees (Superintendent's 
office, Boone Hall, Baptist Church and Ascension Church facilities. 

Acquisition of Fixed Assets $ 

Includes purchase of equipment (classroom furniture, office equipment, and audio-visual, etc.). 



Programs with Other Districts 

Includes tuition of residents attending schools outside of Ipswich (Adult Education, 
Vocational and Physically Handicapped). 

Grand Total Expenditures, 1971 

Encumbrances to be brought forward 

School Budget Returned to Revenue 

Expenditures from 1970 Funds in 1971 

Athletic Receipts Account 



S 



12,745.00 

20,457.54 
8,260.33 



$2,522,589.04 
$ 50,653.53 
$ 35,374.43 
$ 16,014.66 



Balance 1/1/71 




$1,197.31 








Receipts in 1971 




8,018.18 








Expenditures 




21,830.72 








Balance 12/31/71 




286.48 








Comparative Totals 












1968 Expenditures 




$1,702,743.79 








1969 Expenditures 




$1,978,510.00 








1970 Expenditures 




$2,522,589.04 








Revenues 




1969 


1970 


1971 


1972 


Chapter 70 




170,928.30 


412,601.98 


569,879.96 


568,870.21 


Chapter 69-71 




28,025.00 


31,812.00 


34,993.00 


45,238.00 


Vocational Ed. 




1,287.00 


5,700.00 


6,270.00 


8,514.00 


Tuition & Trans. 




1,022.82 


6,182.61 


6,800.87 


7,285.06 


State Wards 












School Trans. 




86,993.27 


73,046.92 


80,351.61 


78,390.00 


School Lunch 






37,022.01 


40,000.00 


52,481.16 


School Construction 






89,337.06 




52,686.74 


Title I ESEA 




9,384.00 


9,241.00 


9,200.00 


13,002.00 


Title II ESEA 




-0- 


1,591.57 


1,600.00 


3,851.91 


Title III NDEA 




2,714.74 


5,704.86 


-0- 


-0- 


Title V NDEA 




2,838.00 


1,428.45 


-0- 


-0- 


Title VI ESEA 












Revenues from local 


sources 




5,111.53 


5,000.00 


1,217.93 


Revenues from other 


districts 




12,740.00 


12,700.00 


5,390.00 


Feoffees 




6,000.00 


6,000.00 


7,500.00 


7,500.00 


Report on Public Law 


874, Title 


: I 








Balance 1/1/71 






15,791.56 






Rec'd. in 1971 






3,991.00 






Expended 1971 transferred to 


Education 


15,791.56 






Balance 12/31/71 






3,991.00 







51 



PROGRAM 
PROCESSIONAL 

INVOCATION 
VALEDICTORIANS 

A.F.S. STUDENT FROM FRANCE 



Mrs. Joanne McMahon 
Christine Tsoutsouras 

Rev. David F. Shire 

Page Virginia Else 
Mary Jane Cowles 



Florence Dorothee Leveau 



MUSICAL SELECTIONS BY THE SENIOR CHORAL GROUP 
Alma Mater Peter Charles McKenzie 

I.H.S. Class of 71 
We've Only Just Begun Nichols and Williams 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS John H. Stella 

PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS & PRIZES 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

Edwin H. Damon, Jr., Chairman 
Ipswich School Committee 

STAR SPANGLED BANNER Entire Assembly 

BENEDICTION Rev. Joseph S. Lukas 

RECESSIONAL Mrs. Joanne McMahon 



f Susan Carol Adams 

Diane Elizabeth Alexopoulos 
Bradley James Allen 

* Joan Angelakis 
Peter Bartlett Austin 
John Stewart Baldwin 
Richard Francis Beauregard 

+ Terence Smith Bentley 

Richard Elmer Blake 
+ Catherine Mary Bolduc 

Virginia Stevens Boutchie 

* Stephen Bouzianis 

t Marianne Irene Brouillette 
Christine Elizabeth Bucklin 
Emmitt Stephen Burkes 
Sandra Gail Camacho 

t Dennis Scott Cameron 

f Elizabeth Mary Caren 

* Joyce Madeline Chambers 

t Richard Burnham Chapman, Jr. 
Thomas Peter Christopher 
David Lee Comeau 
John Randolph Comeau 
Stuart James Cooke 
James Costopulos 
Susan Lee Courage 

* Mary Jane Cowles 

f Denise Fiances Cynkus 

Elaine Dabos 

Thomas Joseph De Clue 

Deborah Ann Demakis 

Frank Boyd Dempsey 

Neil Edward Desmond 
t Lorraine Joyce De Trude 

Robert Francis Domoracki 

Deborah Ann Donlan 

Kenneth Leon Dorr 

Debra Ann Dort 
t Dennis Michael Doucette 



Thomas Michael Dudek 
Margaret Ann Eaton 
Page Virginia Else 
Deborah Ann Estrella 
Jean Marie Fairbanks 
John Walter Fitzgerald 
Stephen Joseph Foote 
George Atwood Foster, Jr. 
Carol Anne Francis 
Valerie Ann Frederick 
Mary Leigh Jennifer Gajewski 
Katherine Georgeopoulos 
John William Girard 
Peter John Gorniewicz 
Jeffrey Gordon Graffum 
Robert Tilton Graffum, II 
Michael Edward Green 
Patricia Griffin 
Patricia Klink Gysan 
Dana Roy Hall 
Cynthia Marie Hardy 
Faith Ann Harland 
Dana Kyes Haskell 
Ethel Linda Hazen 
Blaine Quint Hebbel 
Evelyn Ann Hetnar 
Garrison Paul Hills 
John Goodhue Hubbard 
Constance Joy Huff 
Sharon Lee Hughes 
Kimberly Robert Jackson 
Erik Karl Jacobson 
Pamela A. Johnson 
Norman Perry Joslin, Jr. 
Julie Ann Kaszuba 
Roland Joseph Kelley 
Charles Francis Kilgour 
Theresa Anne Klimaszewski 
Bruce Allen Klinger 



t 
t 



+ 
t 



Patricia Ann Klos 
Robert Leslie Knowlton 
James Louis Krupanski 
James Michael La Rochelle 
John Nicholas Larson 
Patricia Ann Laudarowicz 
Claude Joseph Le Blanc 
Richard Arthur Le Clair 
Toni Elizabeth Leet 
Irene Rose Lemieux 
Rodney Peter Lemire 
Florence Dorothee Leveau 
Diana Nancy Lewis 
Kathleen Elizabeth Lewis 
John Roy Logan 
Stephen Scott Maclntyre 
David Stanley Mackey 
Elizabeth Ann MacMillan 
Thomas Joseph Mansell 
Fabian Robert Mansfield 
Jane Marc-Aurele 
Sheila Ann Marc-Aurele 
Norma Ann Marcaurelle 
Karen Ann Marcorelle 
Stephen Jon Marcorelle 
Ann Marie Marr 
Marsha Jean McCormack 
Robert Michael McCraven 
Peter Charles McKenzie 
Mary Frances McSweeney 
John Edward Mollica 
Frank Clark Morse, Jr. 
Julie Ann Mozdziez 
Stephen Lawrence Naoum 
David Barry O'Connor 
David Bruce Oldfield 
Jane Pamela Palen 
Donna Ann Paquin 
Edward Francis Paquin, Jr. 



52 



Michael George Pattison 
William Christopher Pechilis 
Celeste Marie Penney 

* Maureen Anne Perkins 
Mark James Perrone 

f Monever Anne Peters 

* Irene Mary Pickul 
Joseph Peter Pickul 

f Dinah Elizabeth Player 
f Gwen Ellen Plotner 
Susan Dorene Proctor 

* Stephen Putur, Jr. 

Lu Anne Pydynkowski 
Jane Teresa Radzinski 
Michael Rene Rathe 
Russell Ellis Riel 
Carol Ann Rouff 
Danise Marie Russ 



Josephine Julia Rygielski 
Thomas Joseph Scherer 
Martin John Scibisz 
Joan Louise Scourletis 

f Debra Marie Sheppard 

f Gary Steven Sinclair 

Kathleen Anne Perry Singer 
Jan Collister Skeffington 
Francis Ludwig Soroka 
Michael Alan Stanton 

f Karen Louise Swicker 
Gale Susan Szaryc 
Denise Ann Taillon 

t Gail Theodosopoulos 
Donna May Thimmer 

t Ann Marie Tlumacki 
Daniel Joseph Tobin 
Heidi Marie Tougas 



Marie Ellen Tullercash 
Lewis Arthur Vlahos 
Matthew John Waite 
William Eric Waitt 
Brian Joseph Walker 
Ralph James Warner 
Jane Emery Wentworth 
t+ Todd Bedford White 

* John Councilman Wigglesworth 
Donald Harold Wile 

Gary Brenton Wile 
Richard Francis Wysocki 
Thomas John Zabelski 
Linda Ann Ziebell 

f Honors 

* Member of National Honor Society 
+ In absentia 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Sarah L. Weatherall, Chairman 
Dr. Robert L. Goodale 
William C. Hickling 
Frederic Winthrop, Jr. 
Joan P. Cudhea 
Jacob M. Israelsohn 
Costos Tsoutsouras 

Your Conservation Commission took a number of 
steps in 1971 to fulfill its charge of preserving 
Ipswich's natural resources — it's open space, water 
supply, wildlife, clean air, and recreational potential. 

In keeping with its responsibility of stewardship, 
your Commission gave primary attention to the 
question of the town's water supply. Noting the 
accelerating rate of growth the town is experiencing 
and its failure to heed the repeated warnings by the 
town's water consultants, the Commission 
recommended that the Selectmen curtail all further 
building permits until sufficient water is available. The 
Commission strongly urges that no effort be spared in 
solving the town's water problems before the situation 
becomes critical. 

In order to protect the existing water supply, the 
Commission has applied for matching funds from the 
Self-Help program of the Massachusetts Department of 
Natural Resources to acquire land in the area of Dow 
Reservoir. Our purpose is to protect the watershed of 
the reservoir and concurrently to preserve this area for 
wildlife management and a town forest. 

Rules and regulations have been worked out by the 
Conservation Commission with the advice of the Town 
Counsel in order to implement the Town's Wetland 
Bylaw (1965). The Planning Board Consultant 
(Nash-Vigier) has recommended that this bylaw would 
be more effectively implemented if it were transferred 
from the general bylaws to the zoning bylaws. The 
Commission is urging that this be done. 

Of major significance was your Commission's 
contract with the Soil Conservation Service of the 
Department of Agriculture to conduct a Soil Survey of 
the town. The Survey will be indispensable to all of 




"Conservation Chairman, Sally Weatherall and member Charles 
Tsoutsouras inspect maps with Soil Scientist. " 



the town boards for land use planning. On completion, 
in the spring of 1972, there will be copies of the soil 
report with interpretative maps available to all 
committees and departments of the town. 

With the help of the Soil Survey, the Commission 
is developing an Open Space Plan to determine which 
lands must be saved for conservation and recreation 
purposes, and with what methods such land should be 
acquired. Our work will be influenced by a further 
definition of the powers of Conservation Commissions 
drawn up in the 1971 amendment to the 
Massachusetts Conservation Commissions Act. The 
Commission plans to work closely with the Planning 
Board and their consultant (Nash-Vigier) as the New 
Master Plan is formed. 

Your Commission has accepted a proposal by the 
Regional Field Service Group of the Graduate School 
of Design of Harvard Univesrity to do a study of the 
portion of the Ipswich River between the Boston and 
Maine Railroad bridge and the town wharf. The 
purpose of the study is to consider the ecology of the 
river, its historical importance, and its recreational 
value, and to plan for its long-range up-grading and 



53 



protection. This project will be completed in the 
spring of 1972 with plans, sketches, models, reports 
and other information that will be useful to the town 
in making the river a permanent asset. 

The Commission advised against dredging by the 
Army Corps of Engineers at the mouth of the Ipswich 
River and construction of a breakwater. It 
recommended that studies of the effect on water flow 
and the danger of the relocation of sand at Crane 
Beach and the tip of Plum Island be first carried out. 

The Town Treasurer on the recommendation of the 
Commission withdrew from public auction three parcels 
of marshland and transferred their ownership to 
"persons unknown". Upon the recommendation of the 
Assessor, a fourth parcel was retained. 

Your Commission has taken steps to secure the 
removal of the fill illegally deposited at the edge of 
the Ipswich River at Peatfield Street. Possibly the aiea 
can be salvaged as a canoe landing. 

A Dune Restoration Project is planned for the 
spring of 1972. The Soil Conservation Service has 



reserved grass seedlings and is negotiating with the 
Essex County Soil Conservation Service to appropriate 
money for snow fences and the hauling of sand, 
funds arc to be matched by the Conservation 
Commission. Youth groups will be called on to help 
with the planting. 

The Commission continues to help the people of 
the town understand and know their natural resources. 
It has held a spring nature walk, spoken on 
conservation matters to school groups, helped the Girl 
Scouts organize a project to establish nature walks, 
and most recently has enlisted the High School 
Ecology Club's help on its Open Space Plan. 

In March Mr. Charels C. Cobb resigned from the 
Commission upon his election as a Selectman, Dr. 
Harry G. Carpenter also resigned, due to the pressures 
of his medical practice. Appointed to fill these and 
one additional vacancy were Dr. Robert L. Goodale, 
Mrs. David W. Cudhea, and Mr. Frederic Winthrop, Jr. 

Members of the Commission join in welcoming the 
help of all our citizens in the effort to preserve our 
natural resources. 



"Sonic of the last remaning farmland at Upland harms. " 




54 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Edward L. Nagus, Chairman 
Andrew Gianakakis 
Edward Paquin 
Joseph Kmiec 
Joseph Lauderowicz 
Charles R. Terrell 
Henry A. Minichello 
Arthur Moon (ex-officio) 

Being a year of economic uncertainty, with many 
breadwinners out of work and jobs scarce to come by, 
we witnessed a growing pressure placed on the town's 
shellfish resources with an influx of "new" diggers. 
Further pressure resulted from the continued increase 
of algae growth on productive flats. As a result, while 
practicing management control on our basic areas by 
systematic closing of these flats, keeping mussel beds 
from encroaching these flats, and trying to patrol 
these areas against indiscriminate harvest, it was found 



that, at best, we just held our own. By the time a 
new bed of shellfish was opened, the existing workable 
areas were pretty much exhausted. 

All of this points to the very real need of careful 
and planned control to insure an adequate and 
continuing supply of this town's shellfish resources. We 
have taken several steps in this direction, including 
increased patrol and more stringent enforcement of 
violations, greater efforts to educate the public as to 
the need of their support in the town's efforts, 
reducing pressure on various areas through control of 
open and closed flats,, and working on solutions to 
algae and mussel removal. 

In total, we have come up with temporary solutions 
to some areas of concern - violations, exhausted flats, 
mussel removal. However we realize now, more than 
ever, that with years to come, our problems and 
pressures will become more complex, and only through 
commitment will successful conservation be had. 



ESSEX COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL 

Robert W. Spencer, Superintendent 

The objective of the Essex County Mosquito 
Control Project has always been the reduction of the 
mosquito population to the point where it no longer 
constitutes a severe nuisance and a health hazard to 
man and animal. This objective can be reached 
primarily through the employment of measures which 



reduce the breeding sources, and secondly through the 
judicious use of chemicals. As the breeding sources are 
eliminated through drainage and water management 
there will be a proportionate decrease in the need for 
chemical treatment. 

In keeping with this objective the Project in 1971 
purchased an additional marsh crawler tractor with 
backhoe. Since its' acquisition on June 1 , the new 
machine has installed six miles of ditching throughout 



"Essex County Mosquito Control tractor at work during the year's project," 




55 



GALS AND GUYS BEHIND THE SCENE AT THE TOWN HALL 




Electric Department - Priscilla Har- 
ris, Gladys Wegzyn, and Jane Breton 
acquired an additional job in 1971. 
Any water, sewer and light bill pay- 
ments are now handled by these cap- 
able 'gals'. 



Billing Office Annie Boylan and 
Helen Horsman previously processed 
each of your water, sewer and light 
bills, however, in November 1971 the 
Town's billing changed over to com- 
puter. 




Assessor's Office Dot Crowley, 

Varnum Pedrick, Chief Assessor and 
Lillian Horsman keep intack the 
Assessing records which show the 
value of all real estate and personal 
property in the Town. 




Building Maintenance - Stanley 
Eustace, Town Hall Custodian, 
paints an upstairs wall of the Town 
Hall. 



-1 

Selectmen Barb Bruni . . a two- 

hat gal. The Selectmen depend on 
Barb to process all their clerical 
work. The Town Clerk also relys 
on half of Barb's time to assist 
him with his clerical work., birth 
and death certificates, hunting 
licenses, etc. 




Town Manager's Office - Connie 
Chisholm, personal secretary to the 
Town Manager, chats with Jim Daly, 
Recreation and Parks Director. Con- 
nie's pleasant and outgoing personal- 
ity is a great asset to the Town and 
makes everyone's day a little brighter 
in the Town Hall. 



Police Department — Loretta Han- 
cock, one of many employees in the 
Town hired under the Emergency 
Employment Act, serves the towns- 
people with her counter service and 
phone courtesy. Joyce Gysan, a very 
versatile gal, spends most of her time 
doing clerical work in the Police Sta- 
tion, yet finds time to occasionally 
fill in as Probation Officer and Health 
Department Clerk. A continually 
smiling face in the Town Hall. 





Veteran's Office - Frances Baily and 
Frank Storey, Director, assist veterans 
and their dependents to secure any 
federal funds possible. 




Accounting Department - Doris 
Hinckley and Alice Georgeopoulos 
prepare a warrant for the Payment of 
all of the departments bills. 




Public Works Department - Isobele 
Coulombe and Bessie Viator check a 
meter reading for a new resident. 
These gals receive your requests and 
inquiries, and assist you to resolve 
any complaint you might have. 




Treasurer's Office Gloria Klimas- 
zewski. Hazel (Maguire) Schon, 
George Mourikas, Treas.-Coll., and 
Sophie Rygielski (seated) collect your 
payments for real estate and excise 
taxes. 



POLICE EMERGENCY 356-4343 

FIRE EMERGENCY 356-4321 



Be sure to give your name and address as well as the nature of your emergency clearly. Do not 
hang up until you are sure that your message has been understood. 



FOR ANSWERS ON: 

Assessments 

Payment of Taxes 

Payment of Water and Light Bills 

Billing, Water and Light 

Birth, Death, Marriage Cert. 

Building & Civil Defense 

Cemeteries 

Dog, Hunting, Fishing Licenses 

Education Information 

Elections, Voting, Registration 

Electric 

Engineering 

Fire, Routine 

Health, Sanitation, Rubbish 

Highway and Streets 

Library 

Licensing Authority 

Oil Burner Permits 

Permits for Burning 

Permits for Large Quantity Dumping 

Recreation 

Schools 



Sewer 

Veteran's Services 

Water Problems 

Welfare (Comm. of Mass.) 

Youth 

MEETINGS 

Annual Town Meeting 

Annual Town Election 

Conservation Commission 

Finance Committee 

Board of Health 

Industrial Development Comm. 

library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Recreation & Parks Comm. 

School Committee 

Selectmen 

Historical Commission 

Cemetery Commission 

Housing Authority 

Shellfish Advisory Committee 

Youth Commission 



CALL THE TELEPHONE 

Office of the Assessor 356-4010 

Treasurer and Collector 356-3100 

Electric Light Dept 356-4331 

Billing Office 356-4830 

Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Building Inspector _. 356-5333 

Cemetery Superintendent 356-3933 

Town Clerk's Office 3564161 

School Superintendent 356-2935 

Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Electric Light Dept 356-4331 

Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Fire Department 356-4322 

Board of Health 356-4900 

Public Works Dept 356-559 1 

Librarian 356-4646 

Board of Selectmen 356-2262 

Fire Chief ..'. 3564322 

Fire Department 356-4322 

Town Manager's Office 356-4848 

Recreation and Parks 356-3767 

Burley School 356-2666 

High School 356-3137 

Junior High School 356-3535 

Doyon School . . . 356-5506 

Shatswell School 356-2312 

Winthrop School 356-2976 

Nurse 356-5507 

356-3535 

Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Veteran's Agent 356-3915 

Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Welfare Office 356-575 1 

Recreation Dept 356-0312 

DAY & TIME PLACE 

1st Mon. in March High School 

2nd Mon. in March Precinct Polling Place 

1st Thurs. of ea. mo. Court Room 

Last Thurs. of ea. mo. Court Room 

Last Wed. of ea. mo. Health Office 

2nd & 4th Tues. of ea. mo. Court Room 

3rd Mon. of ea. mo. Library 

Every other Tues. Court Room 

2nd Wed. of ea. mo. Memorial Bldg. 

1st & 3rd Wed. of ea. mo. Supt. Office 

Every Monday Court Room 

2nd & 4th Wed. of ea. mo. Court Room 

2nd Mon. of ea. mo. Cemetery Office 

2nd Mon. of ea. mo. Community Bldg. Caroline Ave. 

1st & 3rd Thurs. of ea. mo. Town Hall 

1st & 3rd Tues. of ea. mo. Town Hall 



ROWLEY PRINTING. INC 
ROWLEY. MASS 



the district. The summer of 1971 was the first during 
which we were able to carry on a program of 
drainage simultaneously with the spraying and fogging 
attack on the adult mosquito. We consider this a 
major step forward. 

During the month of March a total of 54 acres of 
fresh water woodland pools were treated by the 
application of the pesticide methoxychlor to the 
surface of the ice. These pools are but depressions 
filled with water from fall rains and melting snows 
and have no association with marshes or wetlands. In 
a normal summer season they will be completely dry 
by mid-July. Prior to drying they are the major source 
of the fresh water species of mosquitoes which appear 
on the wing annually around Memorial Day. 

Beginning on April 14 and continuing through May 
19, 43 acres of woodland pools not treated during the 
ice dusting program, received an application of a 
larvicide known commercially as Abate, an 
organophosphate. This material has proven, if applied 
at the recommended dosage of one fluid ounce per 
acre of water surface, to be comparatively non-toxic 
to all but the target organism, that is the mosquito 
larva, and then only in its first three instars or 
molting stages. The fourth instar and pupal stage along 
with other aquatic organisms are unaffected by this 
treatment. 

Once again in 1971 as in previous years the Project 
conducted a fogging program to combat the adult 
mosquito during June, July and August. An attempt 
was made to maintain a schedule whereby one fogger 
was at work in Ipswich on the average of one day 
per week during the fourteen week period. 

As Superintendent of the Essex County Mosquito 
Control Project I am pleased to report to the Town 



of Ipswich a great increase in the source reduction or 
drainage phase of our program during 1971, both in 
upland areas and in reclamation of ditching on the 
salt marsh. On April 21 and 22, employing a tractor 
with backhoe, 330 feet of badly clogged brook on the 
property of Mrs. Susan Ericson, Lakeman's Lane were 
dredged successfully eliminating a sizeable area of 
mosquito breeding surface water. In May 625 feet of 
brook running through the Stephen Tufts property was 
reclaimed in like manner. In these areas the dense 
undergrowth was first removed from both banks of 
the stream for a width of at least ten feet. This 
brushing was of course accomplished manually. On 
May 26, 168 feet of ditching was installed to the rear 
of property at 27 East St. 

As the residents of Ipswich well realize, the 
thousands of acres of salt marsh within the town are 
the source of the majority of mosquitoes plaguing 
them during July and August and oftentimes in 
September. In order to reduce the mosquito breeding 
potential of these marshes the Project during 
September and October recut and opened to tidal flow 
42,700 feet of salt marsh ditches to the east of Town 
Farm Road. Another 7,000 feet of ditches were 
opened up on the property of Miss Sally Dodge off 
Jeffrey's Neck Road. This work was accomplished by 
the specially designed tractor owned by the Project. 

As you, the residents of Ipswich, assess this report, 
please bear in mind that the objective of this Project 
is the gradual abatement on a permanent basis of the 
mosquito nuisance. We will continue to follow this 
course with an ever increasing effort, knowing full well 
that at times the temporary stop gap measures would 
provide a more politically expedient route. We enjoy 
the complete cooperation of all but a very small 
minority of Ipswich residents and for this we are 
grateful. 




"Town Manager inspects a greenhead trap with 50,000 or 
more dead insects. " 



57 



ANNUAL SALARY RATE* 


1971 UNION CONTRACT - 


IPSWICH 






Local 1098 






AFL-CIO 






Step D 


Title 


Grade 


Maximum Rate 


Distribution Foreman 


28 


5.77 




27 


5.57 


Head Lineman 


26 


5.36 




25 


5.17 


Lineman - 1st Class 


24 


4.98 


Assistant Plant Supt. 


23 


4.80 


Electric Meier Dept. Supv. 


23 


4.80 


Operatoi Electrician 


22 


4.63 


Station Operator 


20 


4.30 


Mechanic 


19 


4.14 


Assistant Highway Supt. 


18 


4.00 


Crew Foreman -Water :Cemetery 


18 


4.00 


Sewer - Operator 


18 


4.00 


lineman - 2nd Class 


17 


3.85 


Operators Helper 


16 


3.71 




15 


3.58 




15 


3.58 


Apprentice Lineman 


14 


3.46 


Tree Climber 


14 


3.46 


Stock Clerk-Meter Reader 


14 


3.46 


Clerk IV 


14 


$.46 


Equipment Operator - Water 


13 


3.33 


Equipment Operatoi 


13 


J .33 




13 


3.33 


Stock Clerk 


12 


3.2 3 


Records Clerk 


12 


3.2 3 



"A banquet for the Golden A gen One oj many activities for this group throughout the year. " 




58 



Public Works Clerk 

Electric Meter Reader 

Water Meter Reader 

Sprayer 

Clerk III 

Driver - Laborer 

Clerk II 

Building Maintenance 

Grounds Keeper 

Clerk I 



These rates based on 1088 
and 1820 hr/yr for clerical 



SALARY RATE - POLICE 1971 



12 3.23 

12 3.23 

12 3.23 

12 3.23 

12 3.23 

11 3.11 

11 3.11 

10 3.00 

10 3.00 

10 3.00 

9 2.90 

9 2.90 

8 2.80 

8 2.80 

7 2.70 

7 2.70 
hi/yr for laboring classes 
classes 

SALARY RATE - FIRE DEPARTMENT 1971 



Patrolman 

Hourly 
Yearly 

Sergeant 

Hourly 
Yearly 



Grade Step A Step B Step C Step D 



4 
4 



3.80 
7,934 



4.54 
9,494 



3.93 
8,225 



4.71 
9,850 



4.07 
8,517 



4.23 
8,850 



Firefighter 

Hourly 
Yearly 

Captain 

Hourly 
Yearly 



Grade Step A Step B Step C Step D 



4 
4 



2.71 
7,933 

Acting 

3.13 
9.143 



2.81 
8,225 

Provisional 

3.25 
9,493 



2.91 
8,517 



3.03 
8.850 



Permanent 

3.37 
9,850 



Based on 2088 Hours Yearly 



Based on 2920 Hours Yearly 



"Former Selectman, Charles Rose, presents 
Welfare Social Worker, Eunice Ellis, with a 
money bouquet at the Farewell to Welfare 
Party. The Welfare Department moved to 
the Essex Town Hall December first. " 




59 















IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



I II Hill llll 



3 2122 00162 122 



IN MEMORIAM 





EDWARD M. KELLEHER 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

MODERATOR 

April 7, 1 971 



ANTHONY A. MURAWSK1 

TOWN CLERK 

September 23, 1971 



FRANK COLLINS 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

October 28, 1971 



MA URICE ROBISHA W 
FIRE 

November 20, 1971 






JESSIE LEET 

CEMETER Y 

February 18, 1971 



LOUIS CLEMENTS 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

March 4, 1971 



WILLIAM DUNBAR 

WELFARE 
October 18, 1971 



Ipswich Pub- <^ry 

I pswi c h, M *3 



GREENHEAD FLY 



Courtesy of Essex County 
Mosquito Control 





IPSWICH 
CLAM